cobaea


Also found in: Wikipedia.
Related to cobaea: cobaea vine

cobaea

(kəʊˈbiːə)
n
(Plants) any climbing shrub of the tropical American genus Cobaea, esp C. scandens, grown for its large trumpet-shaped purple or white flowers: family Polemoniaceae
[named after Bernabé Cobo (1572–1659), Jesuit missionary and naturalist]
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to our Antipodean present, we are going to sow morning glory, with its big blue trumpets, and Cobaea scandens, the cup and saucer vine.
In Polemoniaceae, Cobaea species and Loeseliastrum are pronouncedly monosymmetric (Grant & Grant, 1965; J.
Annual climbers like the exotic Cobaea scandens, the cup and saucer plant, and the fabulous blue trumpets of morning glory, Ipomoea tricolor Heavenly Blue, planted in pots and grown up a tripod of bamboo canes can be popped into any gaps that appear in borders.
Annual climbers like the exotic Cobaea scandens, the cup and saucer plant, and the fabulous blue trumpets of morning glory, Ipomoea tricolor 'Heavenly Blue', planted in pots and grown up a tripod of bamboo canes can be popped into any gaps that appear in borders.
In a sunny, sheltered spot, plant out half-hardy climbers such as ipomoea (morning glory), cobaea scandens (cup and saucer plant) and eccremocarpus scaber (Chilean glory vine).
I've had success, too, with a tripod of twigs to support annual climbers like sweet peas or cobaea scandens (the cup-and-saucer vine).
IF YOU have ever seen the perennial cup and saucer flower, Cobaea scandens, in its full summer glory or an old conifer covered in the scarlet red flowers of the Flame Creeper, Tropaeolum speciosum, you will know that the world of summer flowering garden climbers goes way beyond the limited vision of clematis and the climbing rose.
I've made a list of some of the new indoor plants which Hessayon includes in Book Two; such as Cobaea and Correa, Metrosideros and Pachypodium, Tweedia and Wattakaka.
Penstemon cobaea is mapped in the region I counties of Montgomery, Walker, Houston, and Anderson (Turner et al.