coca

(redirected from Coca leaf)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

co·ca

 (kō′kə)
n.
1. Any of certain Andean evergreen shrubs or small trees of the genus Erythroxylum, especially E. coca, whose leaves contain cocaine and other alkaloids.
2. The dried leaves of such a plant, chewed by people of the Andes for a stimulating effect and also used for extraction of cocaine and other alkaloids.

[Spanish, from Quechua kúka.]

coca

(ˈkəʊkə)
n
1. (Plants) either of two shrubs, Erythroxylon coca or E. truxiuense, native to the Andes: family Erythroxylaceae
2. (Recreational Drugs) the dried leaves of these shrubs and related plants, which contain cocaine and are chewed by the peoples of the Andes for their stimulating effects
[C17: from Spanish, from Quechuan kúka]

co•ca

(ˈkoʊ kə)

n., pl. -cas.
1. a shrub, Erythroxylumcoca, of the family Erythroxylaceae, native to the Andes, having simple alternate leaves and small yellowish flowers.
2. the dried leaves of this shrub, which are chewed for their stimulant properties and which yield cocaine and other alkaloids.
[1610–20; < Sp < Quechua kuka]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coca - a South American shrub whose leaves are chewed by natives of the Andes; a source of cocaine
Erythroxylon, Erythroxylum, genus Erythroxylon, genus Erythroxylum - a large genus of South American shrubs and small trees of the family Erythroxylaceae
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
2.Coca - United States comedienne who starred in early television shows with Sid Caesar (1908-2001)
3.coca - dried leaves of the coca plant (and related plants that also contain cocaine); chewed by Andean people for their stimulating effect
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
cocain, cocaine - a narcotic (alkaloid) extracted from coca leaves; used as a surface anesthetic or taken for pleasure; can become powerfully addictive
plant product - a product made from plant material
Translations

coca

[ˈkəʊkə] Ncoca f

coca

n
(= shrub)Koka f
no pl (= dried leaves)Kokablätter pl, → Koka f

co·ca

n. coca, planta de cuyas hojas se extrae la cocaína.

coca

n (bot) coca
References in periodicals archive ?
He has specifically requested he wants to chew coca, so we will be awaiting the Holy Father with the sacred coca leaf.
Bolivia is one of the world's three largest producers of coca leaf for cocaine and other illegal drug products.
3) Because the coca leaf is the "natural form" of this notorious stimulant, coca leaf chewing was banned by the United Nations.
Containing coca leaf extract and kola nut, his syrup debuted in Atlanta on May 8, 1886.
In 2013, the quantity of coca leaf traded in the two authorized markets - Villa FEitima and Sabaca - weighed 19,150 tons, equivalent to 53 per cent of the total coca leaf production.
MaCoca[TM], a proprietary blend that is derived from a decocainized Coca Leaf is an ingredient shared by only a handful of companies in the world, Coca Cola being one of the select few.
For centuries, a limited quantity of Bolivian coca leaf has been chewed and used in traditional rituals, but in the 1970s and 1980s the emergence of the drug trade led to a rapid increase in coca cultivated to make cocaine.
Flores has chewed coca leaf, a stimulant that wards off hunger, his whole life and said that while he has tried alcohol, he does not drink it at all now.
The presidential gathering in Cochabamba, Bolivia - where Morales began his political career as the leader of coca leaf farmers - is aimed at expressing outrage over his "virtual kidnapping" and the U.
Vicos owner and manager Victor Escobar said that it is a highly fermented white beer with five percent alcohol content, unfiltered, unpasteurized, and has moderate aroma, color and flavor of coca leaf and hops.
A Secret History of Coffee, Coca & Cola provides a lively history of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine and more, providing a fun illustrated book reflecting new research in the coca leaf trade conducted by The Coca Cola Company.
11, the UN accepted a demand from Bolivia, which had been working hard since mid-2011 for recognition of Bolivians' right to chew coca leaf (aculliar), a common practice among Andean communities.