cockney

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cock·ney

or Cock·ney (kŏk′nē)
n. pl. cock·neys or Cock·neys
1. A native of the East End of London.
2. The dialect or accent of the natives of the East End of London.
adj.
Relating to cockneys or their dialect.

[Middle English cokenei, cock's egg, pampered child, city dweller : coken, cock (possibly blend of cok; see cock1, and chiken, chicken; see chicken) + ei, egg (from Old English ǣg; see awi- in Indo-European roots).]

cockney

(ˈkɒknɪ)
n
1. (Peoples) (often capital) a native of London, esp of the working class born in the East End, speaking a characteristic dialect of English. Traditionally defined as someone born within the sound of the bells of St Mary-le-Bow church
2. (Linguistics) the urban dialect of London or its East End
3. (Animals) Austral a young snapper fish
adj
4. (Peoples) characteristic of cockneys or their dialect of English
5. (Languages) characteristic of cockneys or their dialect of English
[C14: from cokeney, literally: cock's egg, later applied contemptuously to townsmen, from cokene, genitive plural of cok cock1 + ey egg1]
ˈcockneyish adj

cock•ney

(ˈkɒk ni)

n., pl. -neys.
1. (sometimes cap.) a member of the native-born working-class population of London, England, esp. an inhabitant of the East End district.
2. (sometimes cap.) the speech of this population, typifying the broadest form of local London dialect.
3. Obs.
a. a pampered child.
b. a squeamish, affected person.
[1325–75; Middle English cokeney foolish person, literally, cock's egg (i.e., malformed egg) =coken, genitive pl. of cok cock1 + ey, Old English æg egg1]
cock′ney•ish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cockney - a native of the east end of London
Londoner - a native or resident of London
2.cockney - the nonstandard dialect of natives of the east end of London
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
Adj.1.cockney - characteristic of Cockneys or their dialect; "cockney vowels"
2.Cockney - relating to or resembling a cockney; "Cockney street urchins"
Translations
أحَدُ سُكّان لَنْدَن الأصْلِيينلُغَةُ سُكّان لَنْدَن
londýnské nářečílondýnskýrodilý Londýňan
cockney
kokknei-, Lundúna-kokknei, Lundúnabúi
kokni
koknejietiskoknejs
londýnsky dialektrodený Londýnčan
Doğu LondralıDoğu Londralı şivesiKokney

cockney

[ˈkɒknɪ]
A. N
1. (= person) persona nacida en el este de Londres y especialmente de clase obrera
2. (= dialect) → dialecto m de esa zona
B. ADJ del este de Londres y especialmente de clase obrera RHYMING SLANG
COCKNEY
Se llama cockneys a las personas de la zona este de Londres conocida como East End, un barrio tradicionalmente obrero, aunque según la tradición un cockney auténtico ha de haber nacido dentro del área en la que se oye el repique de las campanas de la iglesia de Mary-Le-Bow, en la City londinense. Este término también hace referencia al dialecto que se habla en esta parte de Londres, aunque a veces también se aplica a cualquier acento de la clase trabajadora londinense. El actor Michael Caine es un cockney famoso.

cockney

[ˈkɒkni]
n
(= person) → cockney mf habitant des quartiers populaires de l'East End de Londres
I'm a cockney → Je suis cockney.
(= dialect) → cockney m
adj [person] → cockney; [accent, joke] → cockney

cockney

n
(= dialect)Cockney nt
(= person)Cockney m
adjCockney-

cockney

[ˈkɒknɪ] n (person) → cockney m/f inv abitante dei quartieri dell'East End di Londra; (dialect) → cockney m

cockney

(ˈkokni) noun
1. a native of the City of London.
2. his speech. He spoke cockney; (also adjective) a cockney accent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kicking off the new concert season, we want to throw a proper party with the queen of rap giving us a bit of fast-flowing rhymes, cockney English rap, alter ego personalities and no doubt displays of some daring costumes," said Thomas Ovesen, CEO of 117Live.
Giles and Coupland (1991) revisited Giles and Powesland's work, with a similar method, and also discovered the same stereotyped reactions amongst British People: RP received high and positive judgments from respondents in dimensions such as social status, quality of language, education, intelligence, and prestige; whereas Cockney English received low and negative evaluations from respondents in dimensions such as social status and quality of language.
What I've actually found with the young people in Tower Hamlets is that they are using a variety of English which is not traditionally associated with Cockney English.
Power noted that for such pilots the difficulty of understanding cockney English was far greater than understanding Canadian English.
The finger of suspicion turns to the media and particularly programmes like EastEnders which are rich in Cockney English.
Dr Stuart-Smith added: "The finger of suspicion turns to the media and particularly programmes such as EastEnders, which are rich in cockney English.
This is the sound heard in Cockney English for `t' in words like `water', `butter', and so on and the sound we write as `h' in exclamations like `uh-uh' and `uh-oh'.