Cocks


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cock 1

 (kŏk)
n.
1.
a. An adult male chicken; a rooster.
b. An adult male of various other birds.
2. A weathervane shaped like a rooster; a weathercock.
3. A faucet or valve by which the flow of a liquid or gas can be regulated.
4.
a. The hammer of a firearm.
b. The position of the hammer of a firearm when ready for firing.
5. A tilting or jaunty turn upward: the cock of a hat.
6. Vulgar Slang
a. The penis.
b. A man or boy regarded as mean or contemptible.
7. Archaic The characteristic cry of a rooster early in the morning.
tr.v. cocked, cock·ing, cocks
1. To set the hammer of (a firearm) in a position ready for firing.
2. To set (a device, such as a camera shutter) in a position ready for use.
3. To tilt or turn up or to one side, usually in a jaunty or alert manner: cocked an eyebrow in response to a silly question.
4. To raise in preparation to throw or hit: cocked the bat before swinging at the pitch.
Idiom:
cock of the walk
An overbearing or domineering person.

[Middle English cok, from Old English cocc, probably from Late Latin coccus, from coco, a cackling, of imitative origin.]

cock 2

 (kŏk)
n.
A cone-shaped pile of straw or hay.
tr.v. cocked, cock·ing, cocks
To arrange (straw or hay) into piles shaped like cones.

[Middle English cok.]

Cocks

See also animals; birds

a contest between two cocks; cockfighting.
a form of divination by recording the letters revealed as a cock eats kernels of corn that cover them.
References in classic literature ?
Chingachgook has as many different paints as the engineer officer's wife, who takes down natur' on scraps of paper, making the mountains look like cocks of rusty hay, and placing the blue sky in reach of your hand.
He lives on the sea, as prairie cocks in the prairie; he hides among the waves, he climbs them as chamois hunters climb the Alps.
One of the cocks of his hat having fallen down, he let it hang from that day forth, though it was a great annoyance when it blew.
Here is a barley-corn for you, but it's not the kind the farmer sows in his field, or feeds the cocks and hens with, I can tell you.
No account I make of dances, Or of strains that pleased thee so, Keeping thee awake from midnight Till the cocks began to crow;
The cocks and hens seemed to know it, and made only crooning subdued noises; the very bull-dog looked less savage, as if he would have been satisfied with a smaller bite than usual.
Having heard that there were a considerable number of fowls in the valley the progeny of some cocks and hens accidentally left there by an English vessel, and which, being strictly tabooed, flew about almost in a wild state--he determined to break through all restraints, and be the death of them.
Dyott was fond of ancient French furniture and distinctly difficult about it, her inmates could be fond--with whatever critical cocks of charming dark-braided heads over slender sloping shoulders--of modern French authors.
For beasts, or birds, take chiefly such as are least subject to diseases, and multiply fastest; as swine, goats, cocks, hens, turkeys, geese, house-doves, and the like.
The chimney-corner and once blazing hearth was now filled with inverted beehives, in which the hens laid their eggs; while out of doors the plots that each succeeding householder had carefully shaped with his spade were torn by the cocks in wildest fashion.
He was awakened by the crowing of cocks, the barking of dogs, and a clamour of birds.
The general and colonel looked sternly and significantly at one another like two fighting cocks preparing for battle, each vainly trying to detect signs of cowardice in the other.