Shulchan Aruch

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Related to Code of Jewish Law: Mitzvot

Shulchan Aruch

(ʃʊlˈxɑn ɑrˈʊx; ˈʃʊlxən ˈɑʊrəx)
n
(Judaism) the main codification of Jewish law derived from the Talmud, compiled by the 16th-century rabbi, Joseph Caro
References in periodicals archive ?
In "A Concise Code of Jewish Law for Converts", Michael J.
In the Mishneh Torah, a code of Jewish law and ethics, Rabbi Moses Maimonides, an esteemed physician, philosopher, and astronomer of his era, offers several suggestions for making the repentance process more concrete.
Mishneh Torah, the code of Jewish law written by Cairo-based Jewish philosopher Maimonides (1135-1204 c.
The resultant spread of literacy among an initially and predominantly rural Jewry (along with other developments such as a unified code of Jewish law in the form of the Talmud and rabbinic courts) created comparative advantages in urban, skilled occupations and a voluntary diaspora; it also led to increased conversion from Judaism (and so population decrease) by those not prepared to invest in the required education.
In his Code of Jewish Law, that is still used as the standard today, Rabbi Yosef Karo (Tsfat, fifteenth century) rules as the Talmud and Maimonides rule, specifying that the restrictions are only on kelev ra:
They tended to follow the Code of Jewish Law (Shulhan 'Arukh), which was written by R.
He characterizes the Mishneh Torah as the greatest code of Jewish law to be composed in the post-Talmudic era.
By the 12th Century in Spain, the genre of computus literature was occupied by several figures, the most important being Abraham Bar Hiyya (1065-1136) who wrote the first major such treatise, Sefer ha-'Ibbur (1123), Abraham Ibn Ezra, a towering figure of scientific learning who wrote a treatise by the same name in 1146, and Moses Maimonides whose treatise on the 'ibbur was later incorporated into his code of Jewish law, Mishneh Torah.
The Arab's attorney (who is Jewish) presented wide-ranging halachic sources to back up his claim that his client should be permitted to eat bread, from Maimonides and the Code of Jewish Law (Shulchan Aruch), up to the opinion of former Chief Rabbi Mordechai Eliyahu and Har Bracha Yeshiva Rosh Yeshiva Rabbi Eliezer Melamed.
Justice Elon traced the development of Jewish law in this area from the Talmud to the latest code of Jewish law at the beginning of the twentieth century.
To be sure, Reform from the start was based upon rejection of the Shulhan Arukh, the code of Jewish law, or any other compulsory standard for the conduct of Jewish life.
Yehiel Epstein in his early twentieth century code of Jewish law.