Corpus Juris Civilis

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Corpus Juris Civilis

(sɪˈvaɪlɪs)
n
(Law) law the body of Roman or civil law consolidated by Justinian in the 6th century ad. It consists of four parts, the Institutes, Digest, Code, and Novels
[New Latin, literally: body of civil law]
References in periodicals archive ?
Principally, however, the government's claims contravened basic legal principles, from the Code of Justinian to the Declaration of Independence.
But buttressed by a consistent if not altogether enlightened legal system in the Code of Justinian and a stable currency, the bezant, Byzantium carried the light of civilization through the darkest centuries of the Middle Ages.
The original legislation was in the Code of Justinian, and honest Fra Luigi admits that he cannot understand it.

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