codicology

(redirected from Codicological)

codicology

(ˌkəʊdɪˈkɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Library Science & Bibliography) the study of manuscripts
[C20: via French from Latin codic-, codex + -logy]
codicological adj

codicology

the study of early manuscripts. — codicologist, n. — codicologic, codicological, adj.
See also: Manuscripts
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References in periodicals archive ?
The 1993 theory would place this folio in Volume 7, as this is the number next to the illustration number, but as proven by codicological and narrative evidence, this folio firmly belongs in the reconstruction of Volume 11 (Faridany-Akhavan, 1989).
27) It bears no codicological relationship to Ibn Tulun's autograph of al-Qala'd al-jawhariyya, and is simply a retelling of Ibn Kathlr's personal vision at this grotto of the Prophet Muhammad, Abu Bakr, 'Umar, and Cain.
Besserman makes use of codicological and (new) historicist insights, though he admits that his approach is "principally intensive and source-based" (4), which I would term formalist and philological.
The first chapter analyzes the manuscript from a codicological and palaeographic perspective.
Here, Gozzi addresses introductory matters including a literature review and the history of the manuscripts, as well as a meticulous codicological outline.
The introductory material on each manuscript source begins with a summary (set out as in the Census-Catalogue) of the contents (by genre) and of the composers represented, followed by codicological information including data regarding copyists, decoration, watermarks (these are not reproduced), dating, and references to the book concerned in inventories.
But these contexts are many: literary critical, rhetorical, generic, codicological, linguistic; theological, geographical, genealogical, bibliographical, and historical.
Lawrence's principal research is on Western medieval liturgical chant, with a particular emphasis on palaeographical, reportorial and codicological studies of manuscript sources from the British Isles and northern Europe.
The objectives of this project concern:a) The influence of a new medium on an existing mediumb) The utilisation of features of the new medium to achieve specific aims and goalsc) The impact of this utilisation on societyMethods to conduct the study of title pages and their sociological impact include content analysis from literary studies, quantitative codicological analysis from book and manuscript studies, and iconographic/iconologic analysis from art history.
Listings and descriptions of archival collections along with codicological studies of manuscripts concentrate upon uniqueness and thus do not fall within the definition of bibliography.
There follow, for every manuscript, descriptive remarks on its mise-en-page, quiring, and other codicological features as well as, first, a selective profile of its spelling/paleographical features and, second, a full transcript compliant with the transcription principles developed for the purposes of the Canterbury Tales Project.
The codicological observations are well made and highly relevant, setting this volume in the company of other highly regarded indepth manuscript analyses such as Julian Brown's 1969 edition of The Stonyhurst Gospel of Saint John (now the St Cuthbert Gospel of St John).