coenzyme

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co·en·zyme

 (kō-ĕn′zīm′)
n.
An organic substance that reversibly combines with a specific protein, the apoenzyme, and with a substrate to form an active enzyme system.

co′en·zy·mat′ic (-zə-măt′ĭk) adj.
co·en′zy·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

coenzyme

(kəʊˈɛnzaɪm)
n
(Biochemistry) biochem a nonprotein organic molecule that forms a complex with certain enzymes and is essential for their activity. See also apoenzyme

co•en•zyme

(koʊˈɛn zaɪm)

n.
a molecule that provides the transfer site for biochemical reactions catalyzed by an enzyme.
[1905–10; < German Ko-enzym; see co-, enzyme]
co•en`zy•mat′ic (-zaɪˈmæt ɪk, -zɪ-) adj.
co•en`zy•mat′i•cal•ly, adv.

coenzyme

A nonprotein compound that activates an enzyme to speed up a biochemical reaction.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coenzyme - a small molecule (not a protein but sometimes a vitamin) essential for the activity of some enzymes
molecule - (physics and chemistry) the simplest structural unit of an element or compound
cocarboxylase, thiamine pyrophosphate - a coenzyme important in respiration in the Krebs cycle
coenzyme A - a coenzyme present in all living cells; essential to metabolism of carbohydrates and fats and some amino acids
NAD, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide - a coenzyme present in most living cells and derived from the B vitamin nicotinic acid; serves as a reductant in various metabolic processes
NADP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate - a coenzyme similar to NAD and present in most living cells but serves as a reductant in different metabolic processes
triphosphopyridine nucleotide - a coenzyme of several enzymes
coenzyme Q, ubiquinone - any of several quinones found in living cells and that function as coenzymes that transfer electrons from one molecule to another in cell respiration
Translations
coenzyme

co·en·zyme

n. coenzima, sustancia que activa la acción de una enzima.

coenzyme

n coenzima m&f; — Q coenzima Q; [Note: the RAE lists coenzima as feminine, but as with enzima, masculine usage is common, particularly in Spain.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Breakthrough research found that two coenzymes (CoQ10 and PQQ) can work together to protect mitochondria against free radical assaults--and to create new mitochondria in the process.
While coenzyme Q10 optimizes mitochondrial function and protects them from free radical damage, scientists have found another coenzyme that triggers the creation of new mitochondria altogether.
A huge research advance in 2012 showed that the coenzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (or PQQ) activates genes that induce mitochondrial biogenesis--the spontaneous formation of new mitochondria in aging cells
Devoted to naturally occurring metal-carbon bonds, the book sums up recent work in the field, with chapters on organometallic chemistry of B12 coenzymes, cobalamin- and corrinoid-dependent enzymes, nickel-alkyl bond formation in the active site of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, and nickel-alkyl bonds in acetyl-coenzyme A synthases.
For instance, if coenzymes appeared before life, "they may have helped make certain chemical pathways more efficient.
Pointing out the versatility of coenzymes, Ferris adds that "they may have survived because they can do some tasks that neither nucleic acids nor proteins can do.
Pantetheine forms a chunk of a larger molecule, coenzyme A.
Both vitamins are coenzymes of gammaglutamyl carboxylase and are thus able to regulate mineralization of bone and calcification of blood vessels.
The ability of vitamin K to regulate bone mineralization stems from the role of reduced vitamin K as a coenzyme of gammaglutamyl carboxylase.
Fortunately, scientists have discovered that the mitochondrial energizer coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) can offer powerful assistance to those challenged with congestive heart failure, improving the heart's pumping ability and even reducing the need for medications.
It is important to clarify that a coenzyme should not be confused with an enzyme (a protein that accelerates a biochemical reaction).
Coenzyme Q10 is well established to be a clinically relevant first-line antioxidant in our defense system against excess oxidative stress.