coffeehouse

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cof·fee·house

also coffee house  (kô′fē-hous′, kŏf′ē-)
n.
A restaurant where coffee and other refreshments are served, especially one where people gather for conversation, games, or musical entertainment.

cof•fee•house

(ˈkɔ fiˌhaʊs, ˈkɒf i-)

n., pl. -hous•es (-ˌhaʊ zɪz)
1. an establishment that serves coffee and other refreshments and sometimes provides informal entertainment.
2. (in 17th- and 18th-century England) a similar establishment where groups met for informal discussions, card playing, etc.
[1605–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coffeehouse - a small restaurant where drinks and snacks are soldcoffeehouse - a small restaurant where drinks and snacks are sold
caff - informal British term for a cafe
cybercafe - a cafe whose customers sit at computer terminals and log on to the internet while they eat and drink
espresso shop - a cafe where espresso is served
estaminet - a small (and usually shabby) cafe selling wine and beer and coffee
pull-in, pull-up - a roadside cafe especially for lorry drivers
eatery, eating house, eating place, restaurant - a building where people go to eat
Translations
kahvila
カフェコーヒーハウスコーヒー店
References in classic literature ?
At one coffee-house chiefly statesmen and politicians would gather, at another poets and wits, and so on.
Addison was glad at times to escape from the stately grandeur of his own home and from the great lady, his wife, to drink and smoke with his friends and "subjects" at his favorite coffee-house.
As to our table, you won't find that bad, I hope, for it will be supplied from our coffee-house here, and (it is only right I should add) at your expense, such being Mr.
Dobbin went to seek John Sedley at his house of call in the City, the Tapioca Coffee-house, where, since his own offices were shut up, and fate had overtaken him, the poor broken- down old gentleman used to betake himself daily, and write letters and receive them, and tie them up into mysterious bundles, several of which he carried in the flaps of his coat.
When he used to treat the boys in old days at a coffee-house, he would shout and laugh louder than anybody there, and have all the waiters skipping round him; it was quite painful to see how humble and civil he was to John of the Tapioca, a blear-eyed old attendant in dingy stockings and cracked pumps, whose business it was to serve glasses of wafers, and bumpers of ink in pewter, and slices of paper to the frequenters of this dreary house of entertainment, where nothing else seemed to be consumed.
The well-known shops, however, with their cheerful lights, did something for me; and when I alighted at the door of the Gray's Inn Coffee-house, I had recovered my spirits.
Over these mysterious figures was written, in large letters, “The Templeton Coffee-house, and Traveller’s Hotel,” and beneath them, “By Habakkuk Foote and Joshua Knapp.
These reverses, however, he met with his characteristic manly fortitude, and of his position as the acknowledged head of English letters he could not be deprived; his chair at 'Will's' coffee-house was the throne of an unquestioned monarch.
Vell, Sir, here he'd stop, occupyin' the best place for three hours, and never takin' nothin' arter his dinner, but sleep, and then he'd go away to a coffee-house a few streets off, and have a small pot o' coffee and four crumpets, arter wich he'd walk home to Kensington and go to bed.
At such a happy time, so propitious to the interests of religion and morality, Mr Arthur Clennam, newly arrived from Marseilles by way of Dover, and by Dover coach the Blue-eyed Maid, sat in the window of a coffee-house on Ludgate Hill.
Fair wards of court have faded into mothers and grandmothers; a long procession of Chancellors has come in and gone out; the legion of bills in the suit have been transformed into mere bills of mortality; there are not three Jarndyces left upon the earth perhaps since old Tom Jarndyce in despair blew his brains out at a coffee-house in Chancery Lane; but Jarndyce and Jarndyce still drags its dreary length before the court, perennially hopeless.
You know by the newspapers what a common thing it is for gentlemen to fight in coffee-houses without seconds.