cognitivism

(redirected from Cognitivist)
Related to Cognitivist: behaviorist, behaviourism

cognitivism

(ˈkɒɡnɪtɪˌvɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) philosophy the meta-ethical thesis that moral judgments state facts and so are either true or false. Compare emotivism, prescriptivism See also naturalism4, non-naturalism
Translations

cognitivism

[ˈkɒgnɪtɪˌvɪzm] n (Philosophy) → cognitivismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Non-verbal and Multimodal Metaphor in a Cognitivist Framework: Agendas for Research'.
His argument takes the form of a critique of Diana Raffman's cognitivist account of musical ineffability (in Language, Musk, and Mind [Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1993]), which argues that musical nuances do not admit of cognitive representation--conceptualization and recall--and are thus inexpressible verbally.
All of them consist of a theoretical part that relies on recent cognitivist and narrative theory (or for the former on some of its precursors), followed by a reading of either selected passages or an entire narrative.
The centrality of affect in human experience and beyond was brought to the attention of contemporary philosophy in Massumi's 1995 groundbreaking The Autonomy of Affect (Massumi, 1995), an essay that sealed the advent of the affective turn after decades of cognitivist and behaviourist dominance.
To to deal with this issue more comprehensively, it is important to borrow ideas from the more pragmatic cognitivist approach especially Dewey's and Ausubel's suggestions about the role of teacher1.
They describes interdisciplinary approaches to studying visual narrative; linguistically oriented comics research in Germany; graphic style and story; conceptual metaphor theory, blending theory, and other cognitivist perspectives on comics; textual connectivity in comics; cohesion in written and visual language; manga literacy and comprehension in Japanese children; kids' visual narratives across cultures; and visual narratives in different cultures, including the Walbiri sand story, Arrernte sand narratives, sequential text-image pairing among the classic Maya, and the relationship between language and thought in visual narratives.
81) To this extent, the realist can be both a cognitivist and a discourse-theorist.
Nowadays, mental disorders are evaluated simultaneously in a complexity of ways that include elements of fundamental research, but also aspects of Freudian thinking and behavioural and cognitivist movements.
Similarly radical perspectives on the future direction of the discipline are provided by Maskit, who dismisses the importance placed on the division between cognitivist (advocating scientific approaches to aesthetic appreciation) and non-cognitivist thinking, favouring instead the distinction between universalism and cultural historicism.
The aim of Exploring Functional-Cognitive Space is clearly stated on the very first page of the opening chapter, where the authors claim that they intend to "investigate the relationships among a subset of those approaches to language that can be considered to fall under one or more of the areas often labelled as functionalist, cognitivist and constructionist" (1).
Third, there is a cognitivist (in addition to the ethical) case to be made for evidentialism.
Though distancing herself from spectatorial or cognitivist schools of thought (she considers them reductive), the determination of her approach is active rather than passive in its call for close reading.
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