work hardening

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work hardening

n.
The increase in strength that accompanies plastic deformation of a metal.
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The most important lesson I learned from The Studio at CMOG is the indispensability of cold working in glassmaking," she said.
Its ultra-lightweight beryllium mirror is more sensitive and six times bigger than Hubble's, and it will operate further away from Earth to maintain an extremely cold working temperature.
To know the extent of cold working, microhardness map of the local area were acquired.
Hardening need not be due to martensitic conversion, but can also be accomplished by cold working at cryogenic temperatures.
Cold working can increase the strength of the alloy considerably as shown in figure 2.
It is a cold working process in which the surface of the component being processed is bombarded with small spherical media.
1960 TUESDAY, MAY 20 Cold girls are 'frozen out', boxing champ takes it on the nose, Welsh not unlike Americans claim, and much more made the news 54 years ago this week 'Frozen' office girls OFFICE workers at a Cardiff biscuit factory walked out today in protest against cold working conditions.
Textures are created on the glass surface principally through cold working the glass using techniques such as, sawing, bonding, sandblasting, acid etching/polishing and engraving.
Marigold[R] Industrial is ensuring that even the smallest working hands remain warm, safe and able to grip when exposed to low temperatures in cold working environments.
Waste collectors, however, face many safety and health risks associated with their collection work such as handling heavy and dangerous waste, exposure to hot and cold working environment, or traffic accidents.
Yield strength can be improved through uniform increased cold working prior to annealing, which produces small grains that carry over into the annealed state.
In airplane wings and other structures, techniques such as shot peening and laser shocking are used, but drawbacks include high cost, cold working time, and component damage.