Coleridge


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Cole·ridge

 (kōl′rĭj, kō′lə-rĭj), Samuel Taylor 1772-1834.
British poet and critic who was a leader of the romantic movement. With William Wordsworth he published Lyrical Ballads (1798), which contains "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," his best-known poem.

Coleridge

(ˈkəʊlərɪdʒ)
n
(Biography) Samuel Taylor. 1772–1834, English Romantic poet and critic, noted for poems such as The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798), Kubla Khan (1816), and Christabel (1816), and for his critical work Biographia Literaria (1817)

Cole•ridge

(ˈkoʊl rɪdʒ, ˈkoʊ lə-)

n.
Samuel Taylor, 1772–1834, English poet, critic, and philosopher.
Cole•ridg′i•an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Coleridge - English romantic poet (1772-1834)Coleridge - English romantic poet (1772-1834)  
lake poets - English poets at the beginning of the 19th century who lived in the Lake District and were inspired by it
References in classic literature ?
Not Coleridge first threw that spell; but God's great, unflattering laureate, Nature.
But the odes of Keats and of Wordsworth, a poem or two by Coleridge, a few more by Shelley, discovered vast realms of the spirit that none had explored before.
He was lying back comfortably in a deep arm-chair smoking a cigar, and ruminating the fruitful question as to whether Coleridge had wished to marry Dorothy Wordsworth, and what, if he had done so, would have been the consequences to him in particular, and to literature in general.
Then we come to Wordsworth and Coleridge, Pope, Johnson, Addison, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats.
 One of the greatest of poets, Coleridge was one of the wisest of
In English philosophy too, many affinities may be traced, not only in the works of the Cambridge Platonists, but in great original writers like Berkeley or Coleridge, to Plato and his ideas.
Outside the storm had come at one stride, like the night in Coleridge, and garden and glass roof were darkened with driving rain.
The great distinction between teachers sacred or literary,--between poets like Herbert, and poets like Pope,--between philosophers like Spinoza, Kant and Coleridge, and philosophers like Locke, Paley, Mackintosh and Stewart,--between men of the world who are reckoned accomplished talkers, and here and there a fervent mystic, prophesying half insane under the infinitude of his thought,--is that one class speak from within, or from experience, as parties and possessors of the fact; and the other class from without, as spectators merely, or perhaps as acquainted with the fact on the evidence of third persons.
Much like Samuel Taylor Coleridge, newly single Kelly Hoppen, 52, finds herself in a conundrum - surrounded by men but not one available.
In addition to Volney's The Ruins: A Meditation on the Revolutions of Empires (1791), Coleridge knew and commented (in Table Talk) on Edward Gibbon's highly influential The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776-1788).
The poem The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge has been translated from English into Arabic by Bahrain Institute of Banking and Finance academic and executive centre head Dr Mohammed Alkhozai.
David Fairer, Organising Poefry: The Coleridge Circle, 1790-1798 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009)