colloquialism

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Related to Colloquial term: Colloquial speech, COLLOQ, Colloquial language, List of colloquialisms

col·lo·qui·al·ism

 (kə-lō′kwē-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. Colloquial style or quality.
2. A colloquial expression.

colloquialism

(kəˈləʊkwɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Linguistics) a word or phrase appropriate to conversation and other informal situations
2. (Linguistics) the use of colloquial words and phrases

col•lo•qui•al•ism

(kəˈloʊ kwi əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. a colloquial expression.
2. colloquial style or usage.
[1800–10]
col•lo′qui•al•ist, n.

colloquialism

a word, phrase, or expression characteristic of ordinary or familiar conversation rather than formal speech or writing, as “She’s out” for “She is not at home.” — colloquial, adj.
See also: Language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
firewall - (colloquial) the application of maximum thrust; "he moved the throttle to the firewall"
fix - something craved, especially an intravenous injection of a narcotic drug; "she needed a fix of chocolate"
heavy lifting - difficult work; "the boss hoped the plan would succeed but he wasn't willing to do the heavy lifting"
biz, game - your occupation or line of work; "he's in the plumbing game"; "she's in show biz"
no-brainer - anything that requires little thought
crapshoot - a risky and uncertain venture; "getting admitted to the college of your choice has become a crapshoot"
snogging - (British informal) cuddle and kiss
wash - any enterprise in which losses and gains cancel out; "at the end of the year the accounting department showed that it was a wash"
aggro - (informal British usage) aggravation or aggression; "I skipped it because it was too much aggro"
fun - violent and excited activity; "she asked for money and then the fun began"; "they began to fight like fun"
hell, sin - violent and excited activity; "they began to fight like sin"
dickeybird, dickey-bird, dickybird, dicky-bird - small bird; adults talking to children sometimes use these words to refer to small birds
bunny rabbit, bunny - (usually informal) especially a young rabbit
bib-and-tucker - an attractive outfit; "she wore her best bib-and-tucker"
delf - an excavation; usually a quarry or mine
funny wagon - an ambulance used to transport patients to a mental hospital
boom box, ghetto blaster - a portable stereo
stinker, lemon - an artifact (especially an automobile) that is defective or unsatisfactory
long johns - warm underwear with long legs
main drag - the main street of a town or city
put-put - a small gasoline engine (as on motor boat)
rathole - a small dirty uncomfortable room
rattrap - filthy run-down dilapidated housing
redbrick university - (British informal) a provincial British university of relatively recent founding; distinguished from Oxford University and Cambridge University
Ritz - an ostentatiously elegant hotel
security blanket - anything that an adult person uses to reduce anxiety
shooting gallery - a building (usually abandoned) where drug addicts buy and use heroin
Sunday best, Sunday clothes - the best attire you have which is worn to church on Sunday
war paint - full ceremonial regalia
smoke - something with no concrete substance; "his dreams all turned to smoke"; "it was just smoke and mirrors"
class - elegance in dress or behavior; "she has a lot of class"
setup - the way something is organized or arranged; "it takes time to learn the setup around here"
guts, moxie, backbone, grit, gumption, sand - fortitude and determination; "he didn't have the guts to try it"
way - the property of distance in general; "it's a long way to Moscow"; "he went a long ways"
number - a clothing measurement; "a number 13 shoe"
enormity - vastness of size or extent; "in careful usage the noun enormity is not used to express the idea of great size"; "universities recognized the enormity of their task"
drag - something tedious and boring; "peeling potatoes is a drag"
hot stuff, voluptuousness - the quality of being attractive and exciting (especially sexually exciting); "he thought she was really hot stuff"
eye, oculus, optic - the organ of sight
peeper - an informal term referring to the eye
proboscis - the human nose (especially when it is large)
physiognomy, visage, smiler, kisser, phiz, countenance, mug - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)
can of worms - a source of unpredictable trouble and complexity
hang-up - an emotional preoccupation
think - an instance of deliberate thinking; "I need to give it a good think"
crosshairs - a center of interest; "the war on terrorism has put Saddam Hussein in the crosshairs"
turn-on - something causing excitement or stimulating interest
negative stimulation, turnoff - something causing antagonism or loss of interest
plague - an annoyance; "those children are a damn plague"
bare bones - (plural) the most basic facts or elements; "he told us only the bare bones of the story"
pertainym - meaning relating to or pertaining to
teaser - an attention-getting opening presented at the start of a television show
Translations
كَلِمَةٌ عامِّيَّه أو تَعْبيرٌ عامِّي
hovorový výraz
dagligdags ordhverdagsudtrykkollokvialisme
kötetlen nyelvi kifejezés
talmál
hovorový výraz
konuşma dilinde kullanılan sözcük/deyim

colloquialism

[kəˈləʊkwɪəlɪzəm] N (= word) → palabra f familiar; (= expression) → expresión f familiar; (= style) → estilo m familiar

colloquialism

[kəˈləʊkwiəlɪzəm] n
(= word) → mot m familier (= phrase) → expression f familière
(= colloquial language) → langue f familière

colloquialism

colloquialism

[kəˈləʊkwɪəlɪzm] ncolloquialismo

colloquial

(kəˈləukwiəl) adjective
of or used in everyday informal, especially spoken, language. a colloquial expression.
colˈloquially adverb
colˈloquialism noun
an expression used in colloquial language.
References in periodicals archive ?
You might not recognize the acronym, but I'm hoping I'm not alone in this mutation - that of being afflicted with Seasonal Cookery Affective Disorder, or, to use the colloquial term, "serial stockpiler of crud".
Downtown Beirut, once a vibrant marketplace known as "Abu Rakhussa" (a colloquial term that translates as "father of cheap" in reference to street vendors who sold inexpensive items), with an array of open-air stalls, no longer exists in that form.
She said: "To use a colloquial term, it was a king hit or a coward's punch.
Stereotypes are bandied by both sides, with Singaporeans often calling Malaysia underdeveloped and crime-ridden, and Malaysians saying that Singapore is boring and"kiasu," a colloquial term that literally translates as"afraid of losing" and refers to an unhealthy competitiveness.
This quirky style of architecture is actually known as blobitecture, now a colloquial term to describe buildings with an organic form or curved and rounded shapes.
I remember once attending a powwow and seeing a food stand with the name Nish Chalet, 'Nish' being a colloquial term for First Nations people.
Laughing is something Dame Judi, recently seen in BBC One's big-hearted Esio Trot with Dustin Hoffman, does a lot, whether she's gossiping with Graham Norton on his chat show, posing in a baseball cap with 'Dench' (now a colloquial term for 'cool') emblazoned on it, or mischief-making on set.
This is the source of the colloquial term for these systems: burglar alarms.
the technology company powering travel search/booking and loyalty point redemption solutions for the worldas most celebrated brands, today announced the results of a new travel study that examined consumer attitudes and behaviors associated with the mile high club (MHC), the colloquial term coined for participating in sexual activity while aboard an aircraft.
Abha's community members have even come up with a common colloquial term to refer to the 30 to 70-strong motorcycle and car pools that raid the city's streets.
He now resides in Paul Lambert's Villa Park 'bomb squad' - the colloquial term for a collection of unloved but lucratively rewarded professionals the second city club are desperately trying to shift.
Had I taken the time to look and listen properly I would have realised "us" wasn't just a colloquial term, and that there were in fact two of them.