colonialism

(redirected from Colonial empires)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

co·lo·ni·al·ism

 (kə-lō′nē-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The policy or practice of a wealthy or powerful nation's maintaining or extending its control over other countries, especially in establishing settlements or exploiting resources.

co·lo′ni·al·ist n.

colonialism

(kəˈləʊnɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the policy and practice of a power in extending control over weaker peoples or areas. Also called: imperialism
coˈlonialist n, adj

co•lo•ni•al•ism

(kəˈloʊ ni əˌlɪz əm)

n.
the system or policy by which a nation seeks to extend or retain its authority over other peoples or territories.
[1850–55]
co•lo′ni•al•ist, n., adj.

colonialism

the implementation of various political, economic, and social policies to enable a state to maintain or extend its authority and control over other territories. — colonialist, n., adj.colonialistic, adj.
See also: Government
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colonialism - exploitation by a stronger country of weaker onecolonialism - exploitation by a stronger country of weaker one; the use of the weaker country's resources to strengthen and enrich the stronger country
using, victimisation, victimization, exploitation - an act that exploits or victimizes someone (treats them unfairly); "capitalistic exploitation of the working class"; "paying Blacks less and charging them more is a form of victimization"
neocolonialism - control by a powerful country of its former colonies (or other less developed countries) by economic pressures
Translations
اسْتِعْمار
kolonialismus
kolonialisme
gyarmati élet/rendszer
nÿlendustefna
kolonializmus
sömürgecilik

colonialism

[kəˈləʊnɪəlɪzəm] Ncolonialismo m

colonialism

[kəˈləʊniəlɪzəm] ncolonialisme m

colonialism

colonialism

[kəˈləʊnɪəlɪzəm] ncolonialismo

colony

(ˈkoləni) plural ˈcolonies noun
1. (a group of people who form) a settlement in one country etc which is under the rule of another country. France used to have many colonies in Africa.
2. a group of people having the same interests, living close together. a colony of artists.
3. a collection of animals, birds etc, of one type, living together. a colony of gulls.
coˈlonial (-ˈlou-) adjective
Britain was formerly a colonial power.
coˈlonialism noun
coˈlonialist noun
and adjective.
ˈcolonize, ˈcolonise verb
to establish a colony in (a place). The English colonized New England in 1620.
ˈcolonist noun
ˌcoloniˈzation, ˌcoloniˈsation noun
References in periodicals archive ?
South America presented a vast landscape, inherited from Spain and Portugal, and former colonial empires offered little knowledge about governance after independence in the 1810s and 20s.
But the 1920s and 30s were a time when the British were cracking down on 'subversive' literature being produced in India, Dr Jan said, sharing a little known factoid about how revolutionary literature was being transported from colonial empires to colonised lands in Asia and Africa by British sailors, who took advantage of their 'racial superiority' to avoid being searched at the ports.
Colonial empires provided the matrix of the modern world in the 19th century, and their effects still influence the shape of the world and the division of privilege across it today.
Most analysts, however, say that Western influence peaked around World War II and declined with the end of colonial empires.
The growth of colonial empires helped increase Western medical knowledge, as Europe was not the only site of the botany-medicine interaction.
In the book's first pages, Robert Cribb's maps already depict the British, French, and Dutch routes by which people were forcibly moved over large distances and the places where royal exiles in colonial empires were brought.
Thus, Cooper's book not only adds to our understanding of the end of empire in French Africa; it also challenges all historians of decolonization to rethink the process by which European colonialism collapsed in the twentieth century, focusing not on the ultimate outcome but on the multiple, connected and competing plans for Africa's future that were voiced by Northern and Southern actors as an alternative to both colonial empires and nation states.
The occupation of vast colonial empires in far off lands is testimony to this superior edge over others.
It was particularly during the post-Napoleon 19th century that the Western European powers solidified their colonial empires by military force, except hapless Spain.
A triumphant Reich would be surrounded by compliant allies--France, Britain, Italy--content to exploit their own overseas colonial empires of palm and pine, while avoiding any confrontation with German military might.
Grayzel provides careful analysis of intrawar reports, memoirs, novels, and films about the experience of aerial bombardment, including its use in colonial empires and the Spanish Civil War.
Drained by World War II, they were both in the process of losing their vast colonial empires.

Full browser ?