Coulomb's law

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Cou·lomb's law

 (ko͞o′lŏmz′, -lōmz′)
n.
The fundamental law of electrostatics stating that the force between two charged particles is directly proportional to the product of their charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

[After Charles Augustin de Coulomb.]

Coulomb's law

n
(General Physics) the principle that the force of attraction or repulsion between two point electric charges is directly proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. A similar law holds for particles with mass

Coulomb's law

A law stating that the strength of the electric field between two charged objects depends on the strength of the charges of the objects and on the distance between them. The greater the charges are, the stronger the field is, and the greater the distance between the charged objects is, the weaker the field is.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Coulomb's Law - a fundamental principle of electrostatics; the force of attraction or repulsion between two charged particles is directly proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the distance between them; principle also holds for magnetic poles
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"