combatant

(redirected from Combatants)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Combatants: Enemy combatants

com·bat·ant

 (kəm-băt′nt, kŏm′bə-tnt)
n.
One, such as a person or a combat vehicle, that takes part in armed strife.
adj.
Engaging in armed strife.

combatant

(ˈkɒmbətənt; ˈkʌm-)
n
a person or group engaged in or prepared for a fight, struggle, or dispute
adj
engaged in or ready for combat

com•bat•ant

(kəmˈbæt nt, ˈkɒm bə tənt)

n.
1. one prepared for or engaged in active combat.
adj.
2. engaged in combat; fighting.
3. disposed to combat; combative.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Middle French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.combatant - someone who fights (or is fighting)combatant - someone who fights (or is fighting)
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
defender, withstander - a fighter who holds out against attack
boxer, pugilist - someone who fights with his fists for sport
brawler - a fighter (especially one who participates in brawls)
butter - a fighter who strikes the opponent with his head
fencer, swordsman - someone skilled at fencing
gladiator - (ancient Rome) a professional combatant or a captive who entertained the public by engaging in mortal combat
gouger - an attacker who gouges out the antagonist's eye
hell-kite, hell-rooster, gamecock - someone who is a very fierce fighter
mauler - a fighter who batters the opponent; "Jack Dempsey was called a mauler"
skirmisher - someone who skirmishes (e.g., as a member of a scouting party)
tough, street fighter - someone who learned to fight in the streets rather than being formally trained in the sport of boxing
victor, master, superior - a combatant who is able to defeat rivals
grappler, matman, wrestler - combatant who tries to throw opponent to the ground
Adj.1.combatant - engaging in or ready for combat
military - associated with or performed by members of the armed services as contrasted with civilians; "military police"

combatant

noun
1. fighter, soldier, warrior, contender, gladiator, belligerent, antagonist, fighting man, serviceman or servicewoman His grandfather was a Boer war combatant.
adjective
1. fighting, warring, battling, conflicting, opposing, contending, belligerent, combative the monitoring of ceasefires between combatant states

combatant

noun
One who engages in a combat or struggle:
adjective
Of or engaged in warfare:
Idiom: at war.
Translations
مُقاتِل، مُحارِب، مُتشاجِر
bojovník
kæmpendekombatant
bardagamaîur
mücadelecisavaşcı

combatant

[ˈkɒmbətənt] Ncombatiente mf

combatant

[ˈkɒmbətənt]
ncombattant(e) m/fcombat boots nplrangers fplcombat fatigues battle fatigues npltreillis mcombat gear ntenue f de combat

combatant

n (lit, fig)Kombattant m

combatant

[ˈkɒmbətnt] ncombattente m/f

combat

(ˈkombӕt) , ((American) kəmˈbat) noun
(an act of) fighting. The two knights met each other in single combat.
verb
to fight against; to oppose. The residents of the town tried to combat the government's plans to build a motorway.
combatant (ˈkombətənt) , ((American) kəmˈbӕtənt) noun
a person who is fighting. They eventually separated the combatants.
References in classic literature ?
The facilities which nature had there offered to the march of the combatants were too obvious to be neglected.
At the appointed hour the king made a sign, and the heralds, in their tabards, appeared and made proclamation, naming the combatants and stating the cause of quarrel.
The combatants were placed face to face, each with several members of his own corps about him to assist; two seconds, well padded, and with swords in their hands, took their stations; a student belonging to neither of the opposing corps placed himself in a good position to umpire the combat; another student stood by with a watch and a memorandum-book to keep record of the time and the number and nature of the wounds; a gray-haired surgeon was present with his lint, his bandages, and his instruments.
Injun Joe sprang to his feet, his eyes flaming with passion, snatched up Potter's knife, and went creeping, catlike and stooping, round and round about the combatants, seeking an opportunity.
I felt my heels and coat-laps peculiar subjects of assault; and parrying off the larger combatants as effectually as I could with the poker, I was constrained to demand, aloud, assistance from some of the household in re-establishing peace.
Each at the Head Level'd his deadly aime; thir fatall hands No second stroke intend, and such a frown Each cast at th' other, as when two black Clouds With Heav'ns Artillery fraught, come rattling on Over the CASPIAN, then stand front to front Hov'ring a space, till Winds the signal blow To joyn thir dark Encounter in mid air: So frownd the mighty Combatants, that Hell Grew darker at thir frown, so matcht they stood; For never but once more was either like To meet so great a foe: and now great deeds Had been achiev'd, whereof all Hell had rung, Had not the Snakie Sorceress that sat Fast by Hell Gate, and kept the fatal Key, Ris'n, and with hideous outcry rush'd between.
The openings for the entry of the combatants were at the northern and southern extremities of the lists, accessible by strong wooden gates, each wide enough to admit two horsemen riding abreast.
With trenchant swords upraised and poised on high, it seemed as though the two valiant and wrathful combatants stood threatening heaven, and earth, and hell, with such resolution and determination did they bear themselves.
In this they seem to me to be like a blind man, who, in order to fight on equal terms with a person that sees, should have made him descend to the bottom of an intensely dark cave: and I may say that such persons have an interest in my refraining from publishing the principles of the philosophy of which I make use; for, since these are of a kind the simplest and most evident, I should, by publishing them, do much the same as if I were to throw open the windows, and allow the light of day to enter the cave into which the combatants had descended.
Again, erect upon their hind legs they pulled and tugged like human wrestlers; but always the giant fangs found their bloody part to play until both combatants and the ground about them were red with gore.
But just as the combatants were about to step from the train, the conductor hurried up, and shouted, "You can't get off, gentlemen
Now works its iron will, the startled sand Blinding the combatants together locked In the death-grip; while hill and vale and stream Glow with the flash and crash of arms.

Full browser ?