comet

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com·et

 (kŏm′ĭt)
n.
A celestial body, observed only in that part of its orbit that is relatively close to the sun, having a head consisting of a solid nucleus surrounded by a nebulous coma up to 2.4 million kilometers (1.5 million miles) in diameter and an elongated curved vapor tail arising from the coma when sufficiently close to the sun. Comets are thought to consist chiefly of ammonia, methane, carbon dioxide, and water.

[Middle English comete, from Old English comēta, from Late Latin, from Latin comētēs, from Greek komētēs, long-haired (star), comet, from komē, hair.]

com′et·ar′y (-ĭ-tĕr′ē), co·met′ic (kə-mĕt′ĭk) adj.

comet

(ˈkɒmɪt)
n
(Celestial Objects) a celestial body that travels around the sun, usually in a highly elliptical orbit: thought to consist of a solid frozen nucleus part of which vaporizes on approaching the sun to form a gaseous luminous coma and a long luminous tail
[C13: from Old French comète, from Latin comēta, from Greek komētēs long-haired, from komē hair]
ˈcometary, cometic adj

com•et

(ˈkɒm ɪt)

n.
a celestial body (with) a central solid mass and a tail of dust and gas and that orbits the sun along a highly eccentric course.
[1150–1200; Middle English comete < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin comētēs,comēta < Greek komḗtēs wearing long hair]
com′et•ar`y (-ɪˌtɛr i) adj.

com·et

(kŏm′ĭt)
A celestial object that orbits the sun along an elongated path. When close to the sun, a comet has a head made up of a gaseous coma surrounding a solid nucleus of ice, frozen gases, and dust. A long, bright stream of gas and dust forms the tail of a comet. See Note at solar system.

comet

- Has a tail, and gets its name from Greek kometes, "long-haired star."
See also related terms for tails.

comet

A dust, gas, and ice body that orbits the Sun and develops a long, bright tail on nearing the Sun.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.comet - (astronomy) a relatively small extraterrestrial body consisting of a frozen mass that travels around the sun in a highly elliptical orbitcomet - (astronomy) a relatively small extraterrestrial body consisting of a frozen mass that travels around the sun in a highly elliptical orbit
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
coma - (astronomy) the luminous cloud of particles surrounding the frozen nucleus of a comet; forms as the comet approaches the sun and is warmed
estraterrestrial body, extraterrestrial object - a natural object existing outside the earth and outside the earth's atmosphere
nucleus - (astronomy) the center of the head of a comet; consists of small solid particles of ice and frozen gas that vaporizes on approaching the sun to form the coma and tail

comet

noun
Related words
fear cometophobia
Translations
نـَجْمٌ ذُو ذَنَبنَجْمٌ مُذنَّب
комета
kometa
komet
komeetta
komet
üstökös
komet
halastjarna
彗星
혜성
cometes
kometa
komēta
kométa
komet
komet
ดาวหาง
sao chổi

comet

[ˈkɒmɪt] Ncometa m

comet

[ˈkɒmɪt] ncomète f

comet

nKomet m

comet

[ˈkɒmɪt] ncometa

comet

(ˈkomit) noun
a type of heavenly body which leaves a trail of light behind it as it moves.

comet

نـَجْمٌ ذُو ذَنَب kometa komet Komet κομήτης cometa komeetta comète komet cometa 彗星 혜성 komeet komet kometa cometa комета komet ดาวหาง kuyruklu yıldız sao chổi 彗星
References in classic literature ?
These drawing-room astronomers professed to explain the charred aspect of the moon-- a disaster which they attributed to the intensity of the solar heat; only, on being reminded that comets have an atmosphere, and that the moon has little or none, they were fairly at a loss for a reply.
Comets, out of question, have likewise power and effect, over the gross and mass of things; but they are rather gazed upon, and waited upon in their journey, than wisely observed in their effects; specially in, their respective effects; that is, what kind of comet, for magnitude, color, version of the beams, placing in the reign of heaven, or lasting, produceth what kind of effects.
And, making a digression at this stage on the subject of light, I expounded at considerable length what the nature of that light must be which is found in the sun and the stars, and how thence in an instant of time it traverses the immense spaces of the heavens, and how from the planets and comets it is reflected towards the earth.
I just seem to get hold of a sense that we're all the same stuff after all--you, me, Killeny Boy, mountains, sand, salt water, worms, mosquitoes, suns, an' shootin' stars an' blazin comets .
Some conjecture even that all these suns, with their several systems, our own included, revolve around a common centre that is invisible to us, but which is the actual throne of God; the comets that we note and measure being heavenly messengers, as it might be, constantly passing from one of these families of worlds to another.
Almost in the center of it, above the Prechistenka Boulevard, surrounded and sprinkled on all sides by stars but distinguished from them all by its nearness to the earth, its white light, and its long uplifted tail, shone the enormous and brilliant comet of 18l2- the comet which was said to portend all kinds of woes and the end of the world.
Their apprehensions arise from several changes they dread in the celestial bodies: for instance, that the earth, by the continual approaches of the sun towards it, must, in course of time, be absorbed, or swallowed up; that the face of the sun, will, by degrees, be encrusted with its own effluvia, and give no more light to the world; that the earth very narrowly escaped a brush from the tail of the last comet, which would have infallibly reduced it to ashes; and that the next, which they have calculated for one-and-thirty years hence, will probably destroy us.
It was Kitty Comet, the prettiest of all the pussies, and Comet evidently had a mission to perform, for a pink bow adorned her neck, and a bit of paper was pinned to it bearing the words, "For Miss Rose, from Frank.
She'd read that interview of mine with the Comet man," Mr.
At last a steady twilight brooded over the earth, a twilight only broken now and then when a comet glared across the darkling sky.
No one is obliged to discover either a planet, a comet, or a satellite; and whoever makes a mistake in such a case exposes himself justly to the derision of the mass.
It was already nearly seventeen years since he had received from the king, on November 7, 1465, the comet year,* that fine charge of the provostship of Paris, which was reputed rather a seigneury than an office.