Comintern


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Related to Comintern: Anti Comintern Pact

Com·in·tern

 (kŏm′ĭn-tûrn′)
n.
An association of Communist parties of the world, established in 1919 by Lenin and dissolved in 1943.

[Russian komintern, abbreviation of Kommunisticheskiĭ Internatsional, Communist International.]

Comintern

(ˈkɒmɪnˌtɜːn) or

Komintern

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) short for Communist International: an international Communist organization founded by Lenin in Moscow in 1919 and dissolved in 1943; it degenerated under Stalin into an instrument of Soviet politics. Also called: Third International

Third′ Interna′tional


n.
an ultraradical organization (1919–43) formed to unite Communist groups of various countries. Also called Comintern.

Comintern

1919–43, an international Communist organization to promote revolutionary Marxism, also called Communist International and Third International. It was founded by Lenin and used by Stalin as a political instrument.
Translations

Comintern

[ˈkɒmɪntɜːn] N ABBR (Pol) =Communist InternationalComintern f

Comintern

[ˈkɒmɪntɜːrn] nKomintern m

Comintern

[ˈkɒmɪnˌtɜːn] nKOMINTERN m
References in periodicals archive ?
Tras el informe de Flores sobre las decisiones antes aprobadas por la III Internacional, los delegados del congreso reconocieron a la Comintern como el organo supremo para el PCC, y a traves del PCM pidieron a Moscu admitirlo en el seno del Partido Comunista mundial (25).
Such bodies and publications facilitated the development of multinational networks of writers who continued to associate for decades, while other Comintern institutions, such as the international section of the Communist University for the Toilers of the East (KUTV) also fostered such networks among their alumni who were writers.
An Old Bolshevik who emerged out of the Bund, Brown was best known for translating Lenin's polemic "Left Wing Communism: An Infantile Disorder" into English, and his primary task in 1924 for the Comintern was to build the International Red Aid (commonly referred to by its Cyrillic acronym MOPR) globally.
Unfortunately, we are given only brief glimpses of the Nordic communists after 1945: this is essentially a book about the Comintern era.
Ahora bien, en las pasadas dos decadas, los avances historiograficos en relacion con este tema han contribuido a un panorama cada vez mejor estructurado en lo que respecta a la influencia de las agencias de la Comintern en el hemisferio americano y, en particular, en el entorno latinoamericano y caribeno (8).
6) Internationally, the hierarchical distinction between oppressor and oppressed nations was further preserved and partially reversed, with the Comintern assuming the responsibilities for providing ideological and financial support to foreign anticolonial revolutionaries, including those considered most oppressed in the East.
Given the strength of this acceptance of geographic fatalism, the Comintern did not see Cuba as providing fertile ground for revolutionary breakthroughs and the Soviet Union did not imagine that stable diplomatic relations with the Caribbean nation would be possible.
Far from imposing inappropriate "foreign" perspectives, we see Lenin, Trotsky, and other leaders of the Comintern insisting (and assisting) in US Communists grounding themselves in the realities of their own political and cultural environment.
Moreover, when the Comintern position changed in 1934-35, stressing the Popular Frontist appetite for "labour unity" even if it might embrace cross-class political alliances and uncritical acceptance of working-class leaders in the political and economic fields who were willing to compromise too much, the fate of the separatist WUL was sealed.
They were the result of Gramsci's intensive reading and reflection while in prison against the background of his earlier experience as a leading political activist in the socialist and then communist movements in Italy, and in the Comintern in Moscow.
Zinoviev was the head of the Comintern, the overseas arm of the still very young USSR.
Lutz has identified a long successful political tactic, masterminded by the Soviet Comintern and designed to deceive kind-hearted individuals the world over.