commendam


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commendam

(kəˈmɛndæm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the temporary holding of an ecclesiastical benefice
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a benefice so held
[C16: from Medieval Latin phrase dare in commendam to give in trust, from commenda trust, back formation from Latin commendāre to entrust, commend]
References in periodicals archive ?
As a word in Christian canon law for someone who held an ecclesiastical benefice in commendam or "in trust", commendatarius is a reasonable approximation for encomendero and it was employed in an earlier petition by the native governor of Tlacopan.
Los beneficios eclesiasticos podian darse in commendam, es decir, separando al titular del usuario o beneficiario.
9282, 1 June 1514--Rossi is given in commendam the Augustinian priory of Argentre in the diocese of Le Mans), 587 (nr.
It was this which explained his translation from St Davids to Rochester (held in commendam with the deanery of Westminster) and from Rochester to St Asaph, where he was less able to indulge his taste for good living.
In the instances of his responsibilities held in commendam, such as the Norman abbeys of Montebourg in the archdiocese of Coutances, Sr-Ouen in Rouen, or Mont-St-Michel on the coast, there is little or no evidence of his presence, but rather of actions in his name carried out by vicars general and suffragans.
the person signing the bid must be: (I) an> corporate officer listed on the most current annual report on file with the secretary of state, or the signature on the bid is that of any member of a partnership or partnership in commendam listed in the most current partnership records on file with the secretary of stale; or (2) an authorized representative of the corporation, partnership, or other legal entity and the bi