common-law marriage

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common-law marriage

n.
A form of marriage, available in some jurisdictions, that may be established by meeting certain legal requirements such as declaring the intent to be regarded as married and cohabiting, rather than as a result of obtaining an official license.

com′mon-law` mar′riage


n.
a marriage without a civil or ecclesiastical ceremony, usu. based on a couple's living together continuously as husband and wife.
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.common-law marriage - a marriage relationship created by agreement and cohabitation rather than by ceremony
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
marriage, matrimony, spousal relationship, wedlock, union - the state of being a married couple voluntarily joined for life (or until divorce); "a long and happy marriage"; "God bless this union"
References in periodicals archive ?
The Kahnawh:ke Family Homes Law replaces Canada's S-2 'Matrimonial Real Interests' legislation, which gives provincial courts jurisdiction to adjudicate in the division of property when a marriage or common-law relationship ends.
A common-law relationship is recognized by Canadian law once a couple has cohabited in a marriage-like relationship for at least one year.
Marital status was grouped into four categories: a) married or common-law relationship, b) single, c) divorced or separated, and d) widowed.
This change may be achieved by marriage or common-law relationship.
Island's father had a common-law relationship with another woman who became Island's stepmother and the leading influence in her early life.
Missions were instructed to use the humanitarian and compassionate grounds to "facilitate the admission of an otherwise unqualified applicant who is involved in a same-sex or common-law relationship with an individual who, in their own right, qualifies for immigration under any category.
For example, in Chile there is no divorce, and often a man who no longer lives with his wife, and is now in a new common-law relationship, will name both the wife and the common-law spouse as beneficiaries for different percentages of the benefit, instead of buying two policies.
A few years ago our family had a close friendship with a woman who had lived in a common-law relationship with a priest and had several children by him.
Most people assume because they have been living with someone for some time in a common-law relationship, that they will be automatically provided for, if the other partner dies," says Mr Hansell.
3) The common-law relationship of master and servant exists when a person, for pay or some other consideration, enters into the service of another and gives that person his or her personal labor for an agreed-upon period.
While younger Canadian men and women are more likely to start their lives together in a common-law relationship (about 40% of men and women aged 30 to 39), most, roughly 75%, eventually marry.
If a common-law relationship is not registered when it ends, three years of living apart will end it by default.