commons


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

com·mon

 (kŏm′ən)
adj. com·mon·er, com·mon·est
1.
a. Belonging equally to or shared equally by two or more; joint: common interests.
b. Of or relating to the community as a whole; public: for the common good.
2. Widespread; prevalent: Gas stations became common as the use of cars grew.
3.
a. Occurring frequently or habitually; usual: It is common for movies to last 90 minutes or more.
b. Most widely known; ordinary: the common housefly.
4. Having no special designation, status, or rank: a common sailor.
5.
a. Not distinguished by superior or noteworthy characteristics; average: the common spectator.
b. Of no special quality; standard: common procedure.
c. Of mediocre or inferior quality; second-rate: common cloth.
6. Unrefined or coarse in manner; vulgar: behavior that branded him as common.
7. Grammar
a. Either masculine or feminine in gender.
b. Representing one or all of the members of a class; not designating a unique entity.
n.
1. commons The common people; commonalty.
2. commons(used with a sing. or pl. verb)
a. The social class composed of commoners.
b. The parliamentary representatives of this class.
3. Commons The House of Commons.
4. A tract of land, usually in a centrally located spot, belonging to or used by a community as a whole: a band concert on the village common.
5. The legal right of a person to use the lands or waters of another, as for fishing.
6. commons(used with a sing. verb) A building or hall for dining, typically at a university or college.
7. Common stock.
8. Ecclesiastical A service used for a particular class of festivals.
Idiom:
in common
Equally with or by all.

[Middle English commune, from Old French commun, from Latin commūnis; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

com′mon·ly adv.
com′mon·ness n.
Synonyms: common, ordinary, familiar
These adjectives describe what is generally known or frequently encountered. Common applies to what takes place often, is widely used, or is well known: The botanist studied the common dandelion. The term also implies coarseness or a lack of distinction: My wallet was stolen by a common thief. Ordinary describes something usual that is indistinguishable from others, sometimes derogatorily: "His neighbors were all climbing into their cars and trucks and heading off to work as if nothing miraculous had happened and this were just another ordinary day" (Steve Yarbrough).
Familiar applies to what is well known or quickly recognized: Most children can recite familiar nursery rhymes. See Also Synonyms at general.

commons

(ˈkɒmənz)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (functioning as plural) people not of noble birth viewed as forming a political order
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (functioning as plural) the lower classes as contrasted to the ruling classes of society; the commonalty
3. (Education) (functioning as singular) Brit a building or hall for dining, recreation, etc, usually attached to a college
4. (Education) (usually functioning as plural) Brit food or rations (esp in the phrase short commons)

Commons

(ˈkɒmənz)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the Commons See House of Commons
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commons - a piece of open land for recreational use in an urban area; "they went for a walk in the park"
amusement park, funfair, pleasure ground - a commercially operated park with stalls and shows for amusement
populated area, urban area - a geographical area constituting a city or town
village green - a village park consisting of a plot of grassy land
2.commons - a pasture subject to common use
grazing land, ley, pasture, pastureland, lea - a field covered with grass or herbage and suitable for grazing by livestock
3.commons - a class composed of persons lacking clerical or noble rank
social class, socio-economic class, stratum, class - people having the same social, economic, or educational status; "the working class"; "an emerging professional class"
4.Commons - the common peopleCommons - the common people      
estate of the realm, the three estates, estate - a major social class or order of persons regarded collectively as part of the body politic of the country (especially in the United Kingdom) and formerly possessing distinct political rights
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Translations
Chambre des communes

Commons

[ˈkɒmənz] npl (British) the Commons → les Communes House of Commonscommon sense nbon sens m
Use your common sense! → Sers-toi de ton bon sens!

Commons

pl the Commons (Parl) → das Unterhaus ? house

commons

pl on short commonsauf Kurzration gesetzt

Commons

[ˈkɒmənz] npl (Brit) (Pol) the (House of) Commonsla Camera dei Comuni
References in classic literature ?
To have nothing in common is evidently impossible, for society itself is one species of [1261a] community; and the first thing necessary thereunto is a common place of habitation, namely the city, which must be one, and this every citizen must have a share in.
In the long run selection gains the day, and we do not expect to fail so far as to breed a bird as coarse as a common tumbler from a good short-faced strain.
While occupying myself with these no doubt wanton reflections on the unfair division of opportunities in human life, I was leisurely crossing the common, and presently I came up with a pedestrian who, though I had little suspected it as I caught sight of him ahead, was destined by a kind providence to make more entertaining talk for me in half an hour than most people provide in a lifetime.
Round Moun Usborne, at a height of from 1000 to 1500 feet above the sea about half of some of the herds are mouse or lead-coloured a tint which is not common in other parts of the island Near Port Pleasant dark brown prevails, whereas south o Choiseul Sound (which almost divides the island into tw parts), white beasts with black heads and feet are the mos common: in all parts black, and some spotted animals ma be observed.
Things are said to be named 'equivocally' when, though they have a common name, the definition corresponding with the name differs for each.
In the early ages of Christianity, Germany was occupied by seven distinct nations, who had no common chief.