communalism

(redirected from Communal property rights)
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com·mu·nal·ism

 (kə-myo͞o′nə-lĭz′əm, kŏm′yə-nə-)
n.
1. Belief in or practice of communal ownership, as of goods and property.
2. Strong devotion to the interests of one's own minority or ethnic group rather than those of society as a whole.

communalism

(ˈkɒmjʊnəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a system or theory of government in which the state is seen as a loose federation of self-governing communities
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an electoral system in which ethnic groups vote separately for their own representatives
3. (Sociology) loyalty to the interests of one's own ethnic group rather than to society as a whole
4. (Sociology) the practice or advocacy of communal living or ownership
ˈcommunalist n
ˌcommunaˈlistic adj

com•mu•nal•ism

(kəˈmyun lˌɪz əm, ˈkɒm yə nl-)

n.
1. a theory or system of government in which each commune is virtually an independent state, and the nation merely a federation of such states.
2. the principles or practices of communal ownership.
3. strong allegiance to one's own ethnic group rather than to society as a whole.
[1870–75]
com•mu′nal•ist, n.
com•mu`nal•is′tic, adj.

Communalism

See also society.

the process of forming collectives or collective communities where property and resources are owned by the community and not individuals.
the process of communalizing, or forming communes, where property and resources belong to the community and not the individual.
a communal system based on cooperative groups that practice some of the principles of communism. — communitarian, n., adj.
a utopian social reform, planned by the French social scientist F.M. Charles Fourier, that organized groups into cooperative units called phalansteries, as Brook Farm. Also called phalansterianism. — Fourierist, Fourierite, n.
in the U.S. and Canada, descendants of Swiss Protestants exiled from their homeland in 1528 for communal living, paciflsm, and Anabaptist views, still persecuted for their economie self-sufficiency and their refusal to allow their communities to be assimilated. Also called Hutterian Brethren.
a communal farm in Israël, cooperatively owned, with members who receive no pay but who gain housing, clothing, medical care, and education from the cooperative. Also called kvutzah. — kibbutzim, n. pl.
a native American communal society active in the middle 19th century in Putney, Vermont, and Oneida, New York, practicing a pooling of all property and communal marriage for eugenie reasons.
the social and political theories of Robert Owen, an early 19th-century British reformer whose emphasis upon cooperative education and living led to the founding of communal experiments, including the ill-fated community of New Harmony, Indiana, purchased from the Rappites. — Owenite, n.
Fourierism.
a follower of George Rapp, an early 19th-century German Pietistic preacher, whose experiments in a religion-based cooperative system involved the founding of Economy, Pennsylvania, and Harmonie, Indiana. Also called Harmonist, Harmonite.
communal life, such as that of ants, in which colonies of different species live together but do not share the raising of the young.
a believer in the doctrines of John Alexander Dowie who founded Zion City, Illinois, in 1901, as an industrial community for his followers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.communalism - the practice of communal living and common ownership
group action - action taken by a group of people
2.communalism - loyalty and commitment to the interests of your own minority or ethnic group rather than to society as a whole
allegiance, commitment, loyalty, dedication - the act of binding yourself (intellectually or emotionally) to a course of action; "his long commitment to public service"; "they felt no loyalty to a losing team"
References in periodicals archive ?
But to disregard the law in the implementation of a development project, however big, compelling or justified that project is -including abrogation of private or communal property rights - and expect the Judiciary to look the other way not only undermines the rule of law but also threatens the sustainability of those very projects.
The legislation, know as Ley 445, granted the Miskito and other indigenous group communal property rights to the land in question.
Indeed, although it may have been privately held (at least since the French mandate abolished communal property rights, musha' , in Arabic) the seafront of Beirut has in practice been a shared recreational space for over a century.
In Beyond the Indian Act, Flanagan argues that aboriginal people must abandon any "primitive communist" fantasies they have about communal property rights and adopt "evolved" ways of thinking about property--that is, to catch up to the rest of Canada.
Certain groups have a special role to play due to the private or communal property rights they possess to natural resources and by fulfilling responsibilities in caring for wise use and stewardship of these resources.