phloem

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phlo·em

 (flō′ĕm′)
n.
The tissue of vascular plants that conducts food produced by photosynthesis to all parts of the plant and consists of sieve elements, fibers, and parenchyma.

[German, from Greek phloios, bark; see bhleu- in Indo-European roots.]

phloem

(ˈfləʊɛm)
n
(Botany) tissue in higher plants that conducts synthesized food substances to all parts of the plant
[C19: via German from Greek phloos bark]

phlo•em

(ˈfloʊ ɛm)

n.
the part of a vascular bundle consisting of sieve tubes, companion cells, parenchyma, and fibers and forming the food-conducting tissue of a plant.
[< German (1858), irreg. < Greek phló(os) bark (variant of phloiós) + -ēma deverbal n. ending]

phlo·em

(flō′ĕm′)
A tissue in vascular plants that conducts food from the leaves to the other plant parts. Phloem consists primarily of tube-like cells that have porous openings. In mature woody plants it forms a sheath-like layer of tissue in the stem, just inside the bark. See more at cambium, photosynthesis. Compare xylem.

phloem

Tissue that carries food in plants.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phloem - (botany) tissue that conducts synthesized food substances (e.g., from leaves) to parts where neededphloem - (botany) tissue that conducts synthesized food substances (e.g., from leaves) to parts where needed; consists primarily of sieve tubes
phytology, botany - the branch of biology that studies plants
vascular tissue - tissue that conducts water and nutrients through the plant body in higher plants
sieve tube - tube formed by cells joined end-to-end through which nutrients flow in flowering plants and brown algae
Translations
lýko
nila
háncsrész
floëem
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the vascular tissues in palms are nonrenewable, they must function indefinitely, and Tomlinson and Huggett point out that sieve tubes and their companion cells are remarkable examples of cell longevity as they maintain a long-distance transport function without replacement throughout the life of the stem, which could be for centuries.
Results: The mistletoe lectins I--III in internodes were located mainly in cells of the parenchyma of the cortex, in sclerenchyma tissue next to the vascular bundles and in the companion cells of the phloem.

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