Compton effect


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Compton effect

n.
The increase in wavelength of electromagnetic radiation, especially of an x-ray or a gamma-ray photon, scattered by an electron.

[After Arthur Holly Compton.]

Compton effect

(ˈkɒmptən)
n
(General Physics) a phenomenon in which a collision between a photon and a particle results in an increase in the kinetic energy of the particle and a corresponding increase in the wavelength of the photon
[C20: named after Arthur Holly Compton ]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Compton Effect With Detectors And Other Accessories
We could conceive of a wind of particles that sweeps the remnant undulating energy in the vacuum of the universe in something like the Compton effect and brings it back to the denser parts of the universe to enrich the galactic gas and nebulae where new stars are formed.
In August 1946, Teller and others produced a paper, "Ignition of the Atmosphere with Nuclear Bombs," citing the Compton Effect as a significant factor in reducing the risk of atmospheric ignition, acting as a backup if the other internal processes expected to defeat a runaway chain reaction proved ineffective:
What his Compton Effect experiments demonstrated--precisely and for the first time--was Einstein's conjecture that light is not just a wave, it also comes in "quanta"-like particles.