Compton effect

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Related to Compton scattering: photoelectric effect, pair production, Compton effect, Thomson scattering

Compton effect

n.
The increase in wavelength of electromagnetic radiation, especially of an x-ray or a gamma-ray photon, scattered by an electron.

[After Arthur Holly Compton.]

Compton effect

(ˈkɒmptən)
n
(General Physics) a phenomenon in which a collision between a photon and a particle results in an increase in the kinetic energy of the particle and a corresponding increase in the wavelength of the photon
[C20: named after Arthur Holly Compton ]
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References in periodicals archive ?
We apply a fully coherent attosecond X-ray source based on coherent inverse Compton scattering off a free-electron crystal, developed in this project, to outrun radiation damage effects due to the necessary high X-ray irradiance required to acquire diffraction signals A.
Among specific topics are the complex permittivity of soils in western Rajasthan at microwave frequency, Compton scattering and electronic properties of tungsten ditelluride, structural and electrical conductivity studies in nickel ferrite nanoparticles, and the temperature dependent elastic moduli of liquid potassium.
The impact greatly increases the X-ray's energy through a process known as inverse Compton scattering.
Gamma rays are produced by a number of astronomical processes in which very high-energy electrons are produced, that in turn cause secondary gamma rays by the mechanisms of bremsstrahlung, inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation.
Compton scattering had already been understood as a process of emission and absorption, as opposed to a scattering process, for quite some time, when Feynman diagrams came along, as opposed to what is claimed on p.
An advantage of (31) is that, when applied to Compton scattering, it is not necessary to make the assumption [[?
Individual chapters are devoted to the main branches of inelastic X-ray scattering: nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering with characteristic valence electron excitations, nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering with core- electron excitation, X-ray Raman scattering, the Compton scattering regime, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopy.
These devices use the gamma-electron spin dependent part of the Compton scattering cross section to filter out gammas of a particular polarization state.
Because of the minimal angle of the beam, background "white" radiation and Compton scattering are minimized, thereby increasing the sensitivity of the analysis.