Compton effect

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Compton effect

n.
The increase in wavelength of electromagnetic radiation, especially of an x-ray or a gamma-ray photon, scattered by an electron.

[After Arthur Holly Compton.]

Compton effect

(ˈkɒmptən)
n
(General Physics) a phenomenon in which a collision between a photon and a particle results in an increase in the kinetic energy of the particle and a corresponding increase in the wavelength of the photon
[C20: named after Arthur Holly Compton ]
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Biomanufacturing, Compton Scattering Tomography System with Sub-keV Energy Resolution for Gamma Ray Energy at 1-10 MeV Range, Continuous Learning for Additive Manufacturing Processes Through Advanced Data Analytics, Design of a High-speed, Multiplexed Infrared Sensor Platform for Dynamic Chemical Analysis, High Throughput, Fast-temperature Response, Force Sensing Material Extrusion Print Head, Integrated Nanophotonic Probes for Scanning Optical Measurements and Atomic Force Microscopy
In Compton scattering, the scattering of an Xray by an electron, the wavelength of the scattered X-ray varies with the scattering angle.
Compton scattering, which subtracts energy from the photons, is known to occur for high-energy light sources such as X-rays and gamma rays.
Among specific topics are the complex permittivity of soils in western Rajasthan at microwave frequency, Compton scattering and electronic properties of tungsten ditelluride, structural and electrical conductivity studies in nickel ferrite nanoparticles, and the temperature dependent elastic moduli of liquid potassium.
Gamma rays are produced by a number of astronomical processes in which very high-energy electrons are produced, that in turn cause secondary gamma rays by the mechanisms of bremsstrahlung, inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation.
Compton scattering had already been understood as a process of emission and absorption, as opposed to a scattering process, for quite some time, when Feynman diagrams came along, as opposed to what is claimed on p.
Individual chapters are devoted to the main branches of inelastic X-ray scattering: nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering with characteristic valence electron excitations, nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering with core- electron excitation, X-ray Raman scattering, the Compton scattering regime, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopy.
These devices use the gamma-electron spin dependent part of the Compton scattering cross section to filter out gammas of a particular polarization state.
Because of the minimal angle of the beam, background "white" radiation and Compton scattering are minimized, thereby increasing the sensitivity of the analysis.
Instead, he suggests, a process called inverse Compton scattering may account for the gamma rays.
Z Backscatter technology based on the X-ray Compton Scattering effect, works by detecting and highlighting "low Z" materials (items that contain low atomic number elements such as carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen).