computed tomography

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computed tomography

n. Abbr. CT
Tomography in which computer analysis of a series of x-ray scans made of a bodily structure or tissue is used to construct a three-dimensional image of that structure. The technique is used in diagnostic studies of internal bodily structures, as in the detection of tumors or brain aneurysms.

computed tomography

n
(Medicine) med another name (esp US) for computerized tomography
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.computed tomography - a method of examining body organs by scanning them with X rays and using a computer to construct a series of cross-sectional scans along a single axis
X-raying, X-radiation - obtaining images by the use of X rays
Translations
počítačová tomografievýpočetní tomografie
References in periodicals archive ?
When the doctors examined him, they heard that popping and crackling sounds (crepitus), which extended from his neck all the way down to his ribcage - a sure sign that air bubbles had found their way into the deep tissue and muscles of the chest, which was subsequently confirmed by a computed tomography scan.
The chest and abdominal computed tomography scan results were suggestive of pulmonary and abdominal tuberculosis.
Computed tomography scan of the head showed no acute intracranial process.
A computed tomography scan of the skull demonstrated a mixed-density soft tissue mass with extensive destruction of the right nasal bone, hard palate, maxilla, and frontal bone.
After the routine follow-up evaluation, a thorax computed tomography scan was performed because of hilar enlargement in the chest X-ray.
Computed tomography scan is recommended by most of the doctors across the world.
Based on a computed tomography scan taken after the seizures began, the infant's brain injury most likely occurred hours before birth.
It is our contention that a careful review of computed tomography scan should be undertaken by the endoscopic sinus surgeon to avoid catastrophic optic nerve injuries.
When he initially ordered his own computed tomography scan, rather than seeing his own doctor or going to the emergency department, he (inadvertently) "assigned" himself as his own doctor.
All the patients underwent pelvic X-ray on presentation and later had computed tomography scan of abdomen and pelvis.
A computed tomography scan revealed a blind-ending tubular structure arising from the small bowel with surrounding inflammation.
A computed tomography scan showed extensive calcifications throughout the brain (Fig.

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