interpleader

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in·ter·plead·er

 (ĭn′tər-plē′dər)
n. Law
A lawsuit brought on behalf of a third party to determine which of two parties is entitled to property held by the third party.

[Anglo-Norman enterpleder, to interplead, interpleader; see interplead.]

interpleader

(ˌɪntəˈpliːdə)
n
1. (Law) a process by which a person holding money or property claimed by two or more parties and having no interest in it himself can require the claimants to litigate with each other to determine the issue
2. (Law) a person who interpleads

in•ter•plead•er1

(ˌɪn tərˈpli dər)

n.
a legal proceeding to determine which of two parties has the more valid claim against a third party.
[1510–20; variant of enterpleder < Anglo-French (infinitive used as n.); see -er3]

in•ter•plead•er2

(ˌɪn tərˈpli dər)

n.
a party who interpleads.
[1840–50]
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References in periodicals archive ?
See Gilbert Bitti, Two Bones of Contention Between Civil and Common Law: The Record of the Proceedings and the Treatment of a Concursus Delictorum, in International and National Prosecution of Crimes Under International Law: Current Developments 273, 282 (Horst Fischer, Claus Kress & Sascha Rolf Luder eds.
Lex concursus includes process, avoidances, priorities, conflicts of law, and any stays.
Lonergan's refutation has the effect of recognizing the proper contribution of human freedom to the exercise of divine providence (without appealing to the Molinist mechanism of concursus simultaneus).
corpus, quo warranto, injunction, concursus, workers' compensation,
In the study of biological origins, as in the authorship of scripture, Warfield argued for a concursus or coexistence between divine and natural causation, rather than putting them in opposition.
Carl-Friedrich Stuckenberg, Book Note, A Cure for Concursus Delictorum in International Criminal Law?
Natural substances are ultimately instruments of divine providence (Aquinas) and are able to possess their own causal efficacy only as subject to the divine concursus (Suarez), but they are genuine efficient causes of change in another.
the application of lex fori concursus occurs in cases involving rights
Pracbent enim primum ambigendi materiam, turn litigandi disceptandique copias ad quae fit multorum concursus.
This Good News of God's own giving to each creature what is contextually fitting and appropriate to it, with full regard for its particularity, authorizes the church's own concursus in the ministry of the Word" (p.