Condé

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Con·dé

 (kôN-dā′), Prince de Title of Louis II de Bourbon. Known as "the Great Condé." 1621-1686.
French general who won major victories in the Thirty Years' War.

Condé

(French kɔ̃de)
n
(Biography) Prince de (prɛ̃s də), title of Louis II de Bourbon, Duc d'Enghien, called the Great Condé. 1621–86, French general, who led Louis XIV's armies against the Fronde (1649) but joined the Fronde in a new revolt (1650–52). He later fought for both France and Spain

Con•dé

(kɔ̃ˈdeɪ)

n.
Louis II de Bourbon, Prince de, (Duc d'Enghien) ( “the Great Condé” ) 1621–86, French general.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Every one knows that the Prince de Conde was so called.
He received the letter from the Prince de Conde with a haggard look, unsealed it as he would have unsealed a suspicious packet, and in order to read it so that no one should remark the effects of it upon his countenance, he turned round.
de Conde, and express to him my gratitude for the honor he has done me.
You may bring me his head upon a golden dish, Roger de Conde.
she cried, laughing gleefully, "verily do I believe I have captured the wild Norman of Torn, for this very knight, who styles himself Roger de Conde, fights as I ne'er saw man fight before, and he rode with his visor down until I chid him for it.
Prince Hippolyte, who had been gazing at the vicomte for some time through his lorgnette, suddenly turned completely round toward the little princess, and having asked for a needle began tracing the Conde coat of arms on the table.
Baton de gueules, engrele de gueules d' azur- maison Conde," said he.
On the next day Mathieu Mole, the chief president, whose courage at this crisis, says the Cardinal de Retz, was equal to that of the Duc de Beaufort and the Prince de Conde -- in other words, of the two men who were considered the bravest in France -- had been attacked in his turn.
Another observed that the love of tulips agreed perfectly well with that of politics, and that it was proved in history that many very dangerous men were engaged in gardening, just as if it had been their profession, whilst really they occupied themselves with perfectly different concerns; witness Tarquin the Elder, who grew poppies at Gabii, and the Great Conde, who watered his carnations at the dungeon of Vincennes at the very moment when the former meditated his return to Rome, and the latter his escape from prison.
As Cornelius van Baerle was concerned in the growing of tulips and in the pursuit of politics at one and the same time, the prisoner is of hybrid character, of an amphibious organisation, working with equal ardour at politics and at tulips, which proves him to belong to the class of men most dangerous to public tranquillity, and shows a certain, or rather a complete, analogy between his character and that of those master minds of which Tarquin the Elder and the Great Conde have been felicitously quoted as examples.
I say that according to all probability I shall not be able to undergo the fatigues of the siege of La Rochelle, and that it would be far better that you should appoint there either Monsieur de Conde, Monsieur de Bassopierre, or some valiant gentleman whose business is war, and not me, who am a churchman, and who am constantly turned aside for my real vocation to look after matters for which I have no aptitude.
To conspire against my honor with Madame de Chevreuse, Madame de Longueville, and the Condes.