metalanguage

(redirected from Conduit metaphor)
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met·a·lan·guage

 (mĕt′ə-lăng′gwĭj)
n.
1. A language or vocabulary used to describe or analyze language.
2. Computers A language used to define another language.

metalanguage

(ˈmɛtəˌlæŋɡwɪdʒ)
n
(Linguistics) a language or system of symbols used to discuss another language or system. See also formal language, natural language Compare object language

met•a•lan•guage

(ˈmɛt əˌlæŋ gwɪdʒ)

n.
a language or symbolic system used to discuss, describe, or analyze another language or symbolic system.
[1935–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metalanguage - a language that can be used to describe languagesmetalanguage - a language that can be used to describe languages
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
syntax language - a language used to describe the syntax of another language
Translations
metajazyk
metakieli
hjálparmállýsimál
メタ言語
metajazyk

metalanguage

[ˈmetəˌlæŋgwɪdʒ] Nmetalenguaje m

metalanguage

nMetasprache f
References in periodicals archive ?
Reddy (1979) labeled this understanding of literacy and communication as the conduit metaphor where feelings, thoughts, and understanding are transferred from one person to another through the conduits of individual communicative activity that rely on linguistic competence.
Looking at the very first sense of style in the OED immediately reminded me of a story, which on investigation turned out to be a missing piece of the Conduit Metaphor, pointing to the symbolic nature of writing.
Not to put too fine a point on it, Reddy found the conduit metaphor distasteful and suggested that our use of it was at the root of a great deal of human misunderstanding.