Confucian


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Con·fu·cian

 (kən-fyo͞o′shən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of Confucius, his teachings, or his followers.
n.
An adherent of the teachings of Confucius.

Con·fu′cian·ism n.
Con·fu′cian·ist n.

Confucian

(kənˈfjuːʃən)
adj
(Philosophy) of or relating to the doctrines of Confucius
n
(Philosophy) a follower of Confucius
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Confucian - a believer in the teachings of ConfuciusConfucian - a believer in the teachings of Confucius
believer, truster - a supporter who accepts something as true
Adj.1.Confucian - relating to or characteristic of Confucianism; "Confucian ethics"
Translations

Confucian

[kənˈfjuːʃən]
A. ADJde Confucio
B. Nconfuciano/a m/f

Confucian

nKonfuzianer(in) m(f)
References in classic literature ?
There is little in the Confucian classics to inspire a poet, and we must turn to Buddhism and the mystical philosophy of Lao Tzu for any source of spiritual inspiration from which the poets have drawn.
As counter-examples, there are numerous schools of Buddhism, some of which DO offer a type of heaven; and the Confucian ideal of reciprocity can easily be, and often has been, misinterpreted in the same way as Semitic religions.
Well, but the Jews, the Mohammedans, the Confucians, the Buddhists--what of them?
Sheh Seow Wah of the University of South Australia, author of 'The Strategic Way: Lessons from the Chinese Strategic Thinkers,' discusses Confucian thought in Singapore Institute of Management's magazine Today's Manager.
The city exudes the spirit of traditional Korea, the heart of Korean Confucian culture, which values justice, righteousness and the preservation of civilizing customs.
LAHORE: Behind the scenes and in their usual Confucian way, reliable sources say, our evergreen friends have expressed their anxiety at the turmoil of Pakistani politics.
Its aim was ostensibly to reinforce Confucian values, part of a growing national embrace of traditional teachings, but video of the lectures angered many.
Therefore, this study reexamines the Asian values debate by considering popular value perceptions and institutional preference for democracy among citizens in seven societies with Confucian traditions: Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, mainland China, and Vietnam.
Essays examine recent reinterpretations of the traditional Confucian conception of the husband-wife relationship into one closer to friendship within a more general feminist reading Confucian philosophy.
The first chapter reports the author's discovery that Confucian doctrines can help a Christian become better in his or her faith life, while the next four chapters describe his insights regarding four major topics: family, ethics, learning, and ritual.
The paradox of the new traditional Confucian economy in the two Koreas is that while both of them are officially anti-Confucian, they are both deeply influenced by Confucian ideas, practices, and institutions.