conspiracy theory

(redirected from Conspiracy Beliefs)
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conspiracy theory

n.
A theory seeking to explain a disputed case or matter as a plot by a secret group or alliance rather than an individual or isolated act.

conspiracy theorist n.

conspiracy theory

n
the belief that the government or a covert organization is responsible for an event that is unusual or unexplained, esp when any such involvement is denied
Translations
تظرية المؤمرة
Verschwörungstheorie
salaliittoteoria
théorie du complot
teoria spiskowa

conspiracy theory

nVerschwörungstheorie f
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References in periodicals archive ?
Trying to reduce people's conspiracy beliefs is notoriously difficult.
Although the book deals primarily with the AIDS pandemic, many of the insights contribute to a better understanding of the way in which all conspiracy beliefs function.
Conspiracy beliefs included that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may have been created in a laboratory, and that the pharmaceutical industry invented AIDS to sell more toxic drugs.
Nonetheless, the pervasiveness of conspiracy beliefs in contemporary democratic societies presents special challenges for the social scientist.
Anti-government rhetoric and conspiracy beliefs of sovereigns and other right-wing extremist groups are often repeated in social discourse today; on popular talk shows; and in speeches by some politicians who claim that.
Several researchers have argued that the legacy of mistrust and suspicion of health-care providers, validated by the infamous Tuskegee experiment, Jim Crow segregation policies, and centuries of institutionalized racism, has been driving HIV conspiracy beliefs in the Black community (Thomas and Quinn 1991; Jones 1992; Bogart et al.
It is believed that conspiracy beliefs stem from chronic experiences of discrimination (Bird & Bogart, 2005).
These characteristics consist of backing one or more conspiracy theories unrelated to 9/11, frequently talking about 9/11 conspiracy beliefs with like-minded friends and others, taking a cynical stance toward politics, mistrusting authority, endorsing democratic practices, feeling generally suspicious toward others and displaying an inquisitive, imaginative outlook.
Men who had the highest level of conspiracy beliefs had more negative attitudes about condoms and were less likely to use them.
Conspiracy beliefs may affect birth control use by African American men and women, according to a study published in the journal Health Education and Behavior.
Among Goertzel's (1994) respondents, those who were older were less likely to maintain conspiracy beliefs than were those who were younger, possibly because they were brought up in an era when there was relatively high trust in government.
campaign=wolearlyview) Too special to be duped: Need for uniqueness " motivates conspiracy beliefs, the two researchers in social psychology, Roland Imhoff and Pia Karoline Lamberty, created an experiment with an entirely made-up conspiracy theory.