Constantinople


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Related to Constantinople: Hagia Sophia

Con·stan·ti·no·ple

 (kŏn′stăn-tə-nō′pəl)

Constantinople

(ˌkɒnstæntɪˈnəʊpəl)
n
(Placename) the former name (330–1926) of Istanbul

Is•tan•bul

(ˈɪs tɑnˌbʊl, -tæn-, -tɑm-)

n.
a seaport in NW Turkey, on both sides of the Bosporus: site of capital of Byzantine and Ottoman empires. 7,615,500. Formerly (a. d. 330–1930), Constantinople.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Constantinople - the largest city and former capital of TurkeyConstantinople - the largest city and former capital of Turkey; rebuilt on the site of ancient Byzantium by Constantine I in the fourth century; renamed Constantinople by Constantine who made it the capital of the Byzantine Empire; now the seat of the Eastern Orthodox Church
Bosporus Bridge - a suspension bridge across the Bosporus at Istanbul
Hagia Sofia, Hagia Sophia, Santa Sofia, Santa Sophia - a 6th century masterpiece of Byzantine architecture in Istanbul; built as a Christian church, converted to a mosque in 1453, and made into a museum in the middle of the 20th century
Republic of Turkey, Turkey - a Eurasian republic in Asia Minor and the Balkans; on the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in 1918, the Young Turks, led by Kemal Ataturk, established a republic in 1923
Chalcedon, Kadikoy - a former town on the Bosporus (now part of Istanbul); site of the Council of Chalcedon
2.Constantinople - the council in 869 that condemned Photius who had become the patriarch of Constantinople without approval from the Vatican, thereby precipitating the schism between the eastern and western churches
council - (Christianity) an assembly of theologians and bishops and other representatives of different churches or dioceses that is convened to regulate matters of discipline or doctrine
3.Constantinople - the sixth ecumenical council in 680-681 which condemned Monothelitism by defining two wills in Christ, divine and human
ecumenical council - (early Christian church) one of seven gatherings of bishops from around the known world under the presidency of the Pope to regulate matters of faith and morals and discipline; "the first seven councils through 787 are considered to be ecumenical councils by both the Roman Catholic church and the Eastern Orthodox church but the next fourteen councils are considered ecumenical only by the Roman Catholic church"
4.Constantinople - the fifth ecumenical council in 553 which held Origen's writings to be heretic
ecumenical council - (early Christian church) one of seven gatherings of bishops from around the known world under the presidency of the Pope to regulate matters of faith and morals and discipline; "the first seven councils through 787 are considered to be ecumenical councils by both the Roman Catholic church and the Eastern Orthodox church but the next fourteen councils are considered ecumenical only by the Roman Catholic church"
5.Constantinople - the second ecumenical council in 381 which added wording about the Holy Spirit to the Nicene Creed
ecumenical council - (early Christian church) one of seven gatherings of bishops from around the known world under the presidency of the Pope to regulate matters of faith and morals and discipline; "the first seven councils through 787 are considered to be ecumenical councils by both the Roman Catholic church and the Eastern Orthodox church but the next fourteen councils are considered ecumenical only by the Roman Catholic church"
Translations
Konstantinopol
Konstantinopoli
Konstantinopol
Konstantinápoly
Konstantinopel
Konstantinopel
Konstantynopol
Constantinopla
Konstantinopel
Konstantinopolis

Constantinople

[ˌkɒnstæntɪˈnəʊpl] NConstantinopla f
References in classic literature ?
That was the taking of Constantinople by the Turks.
It seems difficult to understand how the taking of Constantinople could have any effect on our literature.
After tarrying here awhile, the Bay of Salamis will be crossed, and a day given to Corinth, whence the voyage will be continued to Constantinople, passing on the way through the Grecian Archipelago, the Dardanelles, the Sea of Marmora, and the mouth of the Golden Horn, and arriving in about forty-eight hours from Athens.
They carried me to Constantinople, where the Grand Turk, Selim, made my master general at sea for having done his duty in the battle and carried off as evidence of his bravery the standard of the Order of Malta.
And the letter went on to say: "I do not expect we shall go any further than Athens, but if you knew of a really comfortable pension at Constantinople, we should be so grateful.
Mezeriac, the life of Aesop was from the pen of Maximus Planudes, a monk of Constantinople, who was sent on an embassy to Venice by the Byzantine Emperor Andronicus the elder, and who wrote in the early part of the fourteenth century.
He was seized and cast into prison the very day that Safie arrived from Constantinople to join him.
The inclination to goodness, is imprinted deeply in the nature of man; insomuch, that if it issue not towards men, it will take unto other living creatures; as it is seen in the Turks, a cruel people, who nevertheless are kind to beasts, and give alms, to dogs and birds; insomuch, as Busbechius reporteth, a Christian boy, in Constantinople, had like to have been stoned, for gagging in a waggishness a long-billed fowl.
Becky Thatcher was gone to her Constantinople home to stay with her parents during vacation -- so there was no bright side to life anywhere.
The Emperor of Constantinople,[*] to oppose his neighbours, sent ten thousand Turks into Greece, who, on the war being finished, were not willing to quit; this was the beginning of the servitude of Greece to the infidels.
As for Erik, he went to Asia Minor and thence to Constantinople, where he entered the Sultan's employment.
She is a slave whom I bought at Constantinople, madame, the daughter of a prince.

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