Constantinople

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Related to Constantinopol: Hagia Sophia

Con·stan·ti·no·ple

 (kŏn′stăn-tə-nō′pəl)

Constantinople

(ˌkɒnstæntɪˈnəʊpəl)
n
(Placename) the former name (330–1926) of Istanbul

Is•tan•bul

(ˈɪs tɑnˌbʊl, -tæn-, -tɑm-)

n.
a seaport in NW Turkey, on both sides of the Bosporus: site of capital of Byzantine and Ottoman empires. 7,615,500. Formerly (a. d. 330–1930), Constantinople.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Constantinople - the largest city and former capital of TurkeyConstantinople - the largest city and former capital of Turkey; rebuilt on the site of ancient Byzantium by Constantine I in the fourth century; renamed Constantinople by Constantine who made it the capital of the Byzantine Empire; now the seat of the Eastern Orthodox Church
Bosporus Bridge - a suspension bridge across the Bosporus at Istanbul
Hagia Sofia, Hagia Sophia, Santa Sofia, Santa Sophia - a 6th century masterpiece of Byzantine architecture in Istanbul; built as a Christian church, converted to a mosque in 1453, and made into a museum in the middle of the 20th century
Republic of Turkey, Turkey - a Eurasian republic in Asia Minor and the Balkans; on the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in 1918, the Young Turks, led by Kemal Ataturk, established a republic in 1923
Chalcedon, Kadikoy - a former town on the Bosporus (now part of Istanbul); site of the Council of Chalcedon
2.Constantinople - the council in 869 that condemned Photius who had become the patriarch of Constantinople without approval from the Vatican, thereby precipitating the schism between the eastern and western churches
council - (Christianity) an assembly of theologians and bishops and other representatives of different churches or dioceses that is convened to regulate matters of discipline or doctrine
3.Constantinople - the sixth ecumenical council in 680-681 which condemned Monothelitism by defining two wills in Christ, divine and human
ecumenical council - (early Christian church) one of seven gatherings of bishops from around the known world under the presidency of the Pope to regulate matters of faith and morals and discipline; "the first seven councils through 787 are considered to be ecumenical councils by both the Roman Catholic church and the Eastern Orthodox church but the next fourteen councils are considered ecumenical only by the Roman Catholic church"
4.Constantinople - the fifth ecumenical council in 553 which held Origen's writings to be heretic
ecumenical council - (early Christian church) one of seven gatherings of bishops from around the known world under the presidency of the Pope to regulate matters of faith and morals and discipline; "the first seven councils through 787 are considered to be ecumenical councils by both the Roman Catholic church and the Eastern Orthodox church but the next fourteen councils are considered ecumenical only by the Roman Catholic church"
5.Constantinople - the second ecumenical council in 381 which added wording about the Holy Spirit to the Nicene Creed
ecumenical council - (early Christian church) one of seven gatherings of bishops from around the known world under the presidency of the Pope to regulate matters of faith and morals and discipline; "the first seven councils through 787 are considered to be ecumenical councils by both the Roman Catholic church and the Eastern Orthodox church but the next fourteen councils are considered ecumenical only by the Roman Catholic church"
Translations
Konstantinopol
Konstantinopoli
Konstantinopol
Konstantinápoly
Konstantinopel
Konstantinopel
Konstantynopol
Constantinopla
Konstantinopel
Konstantinopolis

Constantinople

[ˌkɒnstæntɪˈnəʊpl] NConstantinopla f
References in periodicals archive ?
For an introduction to Gregory's theology, see Jean-Claude Larchet, La vie el l'oeuvre theologique de Georges/Gregoire II de Cypre (1241-1290), patriarche de Constantinopol (Paris: Cerf, 2012); Christostomos Savvatos, "Il patriarca Gregorio II il Cipriota ed il problema del Filioque," Kleronomia, vol.
In virtutea acestor calitati, la 1 mai 1922 a fost numit atasat militar la Sofia, girand in acelasi timp si postul de la Constantinopol.
This scale (developed by Tzuriel & Klein, 1977; Tzuriel, 1984; and Tzuriel & Bar-Joseph, 1986), is based on the work of Rasmussen (1964), Wesseman and Ricks (1966), and Constantinopol (1969).

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