consul

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Related to Consuls: consulship

con·sul

 (kŏn′səl)
n. Abbr. Con. or Cons.
1. An official appointed by a government to reside in a foreign country and represent his or her government's commercial interests and assist its citizens there. See Usage Note at council.
2. Either of the two chief magistrates of the Roman Republic, elected for a term of one year.
3. Any of the three chief magistrates of the French Republic from 1799 to 1804.

[Middle English, Roman consul, from Latin cōnsul; possibly akin to cōnsulere, to take counsel.]

con′su·lar (-sə-lər) adj.
con′sul·ship′ n.

consul

(ˈkɒnsəl)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an official appointed by a sovereign state to protect its commercial interests and aid its citizens in a foreign city
2. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) either of two annually elected magistrates who jointly exercised the highest authority in the republic
3. (Historical Terms) (in France from 1799 to 1804) any of the three chief magistrates of the First Republic
[C14: from Latin, from consulere to consult]
consular adj
ˈconsulˌship n

con•sul

(ˈkɒn səl)

n.
1. an official appointed by the government of a country to look after its commercial interests and the welfare of its citizens in another country.
2. either of the two chief magistrates of the ancient Roman republic.
3. one of the three supreme magistrates of the French First Republic from 1799 to 1804.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin; taken to be a derivative of consulere to consult, but orig. and interrelationship of both words is unclear]
con′su•lar, adj.
con′sul•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.consul - a diplomat appointed by a government to protect its commercial interests and help its citizens in a foreign countryconsul - a diplomat appointed by a government to protect its commercial interests and help its citizens in a foreign country
diplomat, diplomatist - an official engaged in international negotiations
Translations
konzul
konsul
konsuli
konzul
konzul
ræîismaîur, konsúll
領事
영사
konsulaskonsulataskonsulinis
konsuls
konzul
konzul
konsul
กงสุล
konsoloskonsül
lãnh sự

consul

[ˈkɒnsəl] N (= diplomatic official) → cónsul mf
consul generalcónsul mf general

consul

[ˈkɒnsəl] n (= official) → consul m

consul

nKonsul m

consul

[ˈkɒnsəl] nconsole m
consul general → console generale

consul

(ˈkonsəl) noun
1. an agent who looks after his country's residents in (part of) a foreign country. the British Consul in Berlin.
2. either of the two chief magistrates in ancient Rome.
ˈconsular (-sju-) adjective
consulate (ˈkonsjulət) , ((American) -sələt) noun
the office or residence of a consul.

consul

قُنْصُل konzul konsul Konsul πρόξενος cónsul konsuli consul konzul console 領事 영사 consul konsul konsul cônsul консул konsul กงสุล konsolos lãnh sự 领事
References in classic literature ?
And under no latitude of construction will the term comprehend consuls.
It is true, that where treaties of commerce stipulate for the mutual appointment of consuls, whose functions are connected with commerce, the admission of foreign consuls may fall within the power of making commercial treaties; and that where no such treaties exist, the mission of American consuls into foreign countries may PERHAPS be covered under the authority, given by the ninth article of the Confederation, to appoint all such civil officers as may be necessary for managing the general affairs of the United States.
The Muhammadans' comes on Friday, the Jews' on Saturday, and that of the Christian Consuls on Sunday.
There are many foreign consuls in this place, but much visiting is not indulged in.
Of the first, the two Consuls of Rome may serve as an example; of the last, we shall find examples in the constitutions of several of the States.
He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.
One was the British consul at Suez, who, despite the prophecies of the English Government, and the unfavourable predictions of Stephenson, was in the habit of seeing, from his office window, English ships daily passing to and fro on the great canal, by which the old roundabout route from England to India by the Cape of Good Hope was abridged by at least a half.
In vain the officer represented to Bartolomeo that he could not see the First Consul without having previously requested an audience in writing; the Italian insisted that the soldier should go to Bonaparte.
When I returned from the country I found among my other letters a long letter from the consul.
United States Consul Lingford was a fussy, elderly gentleman, and in the two years of his service at Attu-Attu had never encountered so unprecedented a case as that laid before him by Boyd Duncan.
As to his lordship's retired way of life, we have conversed on the subject with the consul and the banker--the only two strangers who held any communication with him.
In the mean while John Petherick, the English consul at the city of Karthoum, has received about seven hundred pounds from the foreign office; he is to equip a steamer at Karthoum, stock it with sufficient provisions, and make his way to Gondokoro; there, he will await Captain Speke's caravan, and be able to replenish its supplies to some extent.