eugenics

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eu·gen·ics

 (yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

eugenics

(juːˈdʒɛnɪks)
n
(Genetics) (functioning as singular) the study of methods of improving the quality of the human race, esp by selective breeding
[C19: from Greek eugenēs well-born, from eu- + -genēs born; see -gen]
euˈgenic, euˈgenical adj
euˈgenically adv
euˈgenicist, euˈgenecist n
eugenist n, adj

eu•gen•ics

(yuˈdʒɛn ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
a science concerned with improving a species, esp. the human species, by such means as influencing or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have desirable genetic traits.
[1880–85]
eu•gen′i•cist (-ə sɪst) n.

eugenics

the science of improving a breed or species through the careful selection of parents. — eugenicist, n. — eugenic, adj.
See also: Improvement
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eugenics - the study of methods of improving genetic qualities by selective breeding (especially as applied to human mating)
bioscience, life science - any of the branches of natural science dealing with the structure and behavior of living organisms
cacogenics, dysgenics - the study of the operation of factors causing degeneration in the type of offspring produced
Translations

eugenics

[juːˈdʒenɪks] NSINGeugenesia f

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] neugénisme m

eugenics

n singEugenik f

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] nsgeugenica

eu·gen·ics

n. eugenesia, ciencia que estudia el mejoramiento de la especie humana de acuerdo con las leyes biológicas de la herencia.
References in periodicals archive ?
We already have consumer eugenics in the US egg donor market, where ordinary working-class women get paid $5,000 (Dh18,390) for their eggs while tall, beautiful Ivy League students get $50,000.
This is the first step in a well mapped-out process leading to GM babies, and a future of consumer eugenics.
We want to avoid waking up in a world" where researchers, infertility clinics, governments, insurance companies, "or parents decide that they are going to try to engineer children with specific traits and even possibly [put] in motion a regime of high-tech consumer eugenics," she said.

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