contraband

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con·tra·band

 (kŏn′trə-bănd′)
n.
1.
a. Goods prohibited by law or treaty from being imported or exported.
b. Goods that are possessed contrary to law or rule, as in a prison or school.
2.
a. Illegal traffic in contraband; smuggling.
b. Smuggled goods.
3. Goods that may be seized and confiscated by a belligerent if shipped to another belligerent by a neutral.
4. An escaped slave during the Civil War who fled to or was taken behind Union lines.
adj.
Prohibited from being imported or exported.

[Italian contrabbando : contra-, against (from Latin contrā-; see contra-) + bando, legal proclamation (from Late Latin bannus, of Germanic origin; see bhā- in Indo-European roots).]

con′tra·band′age n.
con′tra·band′ist n.

contraband

(ˈkɒntrəˌbænd)
n
1. (Law)
a. goods that are prohibited by law from being exported or imported
b. illegally imported or exported goods
2. (Law) illegal traffic in such goods; smuggling
3. (Military) international law Also called: contraband of war goods that a neutral country may not supply to a belligerent
4. (Historical Terms) (during the American Civil War) a Black slave captured by the Union forces or one who escaped to the Union lines
adj
(Law) (of goods)
a. forbidden by law from being imported or exported
b. illegally imported or exported
[C16: from Spanish contrabanda, from Italian contrabando (modern contrabbando), from Medieval Latin contrabannum, from contra- + bannum ban, of Germanic origin]

con•tra•band

(ˈkɒn trəˌbænd)

n.
1. anything prohibited by law from being imported or exported.
2. goods imported or exported illegally.
3. illegal or prohibited trade.
4. (during the Civil War) a black slave who escaped to or was brought within the Union lines.
adj.
5. prohibited from export or import.
[1520–30; earlier contrabanda < Sp < Italian contrab(b)ando=contra- contra-1 + Medieval Latin bandum, variant of bannum ban2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contraband - goods whose importation or exportation or possession is prohibited by law
merchandise, product, ware - commodities offered for sale; "good business depends on having good merchandise"; "that store offers a variety of products"
Adj.1.contraband - distributed or sold illicitlycontraband - distributed or sold illicitly; "the black economy pays no taxes"
illegal - prohibited by law or by official or accepted rules; "an illegal chess move"

contraband

adjective smuggled, illegal, illicit, black-market, hot (informal), banned, forbidden, prohibited, unlawful, bootleg, bootlegged, interdicted Most of the city markets were flooded with contraband goods.
Translations
تَهريب، بَضائِع مُهَرَّبَهمُهَرَّب، مَحْظور قانونِيّاً
kontrabandpašované zbožípašovaný
kontrabandesmuglergods
csempészcsempészáru
ólöglegur varningursmygl-
kontrabandakontrabandinis
kontrabandakontrabandas-
kontrabandpašovaný
kaçakkaçak mal

contraband

[ˈkɒntrəbænd]
A. Ncontrabando m
B. CPDde contrabando

contraband

[ˈkɒntrəbænd]
ncontrebande f
adj [goods] → de contrebande

contraband

n no pl (= goods)Konterbande f, → Schmuggelware f; (form: = smuggling) → Schleichhandel m, → Schmuggeln nt; contraband of warKriegskonterbande f
adjSchmuggel-; contraband goodsKonterbande f, → Schmuggelware f

contraband

[ˈkɒntrəˌbænd]
1. ncontrabbando
2. adjdi contrabbando

contraband

(ˈkontrəbӕnd) noun
goods which are legally forbidden to be brought into a country.
adjective
contraband cigarettes.
References in classic literature ?
Davis had declared limes a contraband article, and solemnly vowed to publicly ferrule the first person who was found breaking the law.
In his hand he swayed a ferule, that sceptre of despotic power; the birch of justice reposed on three nails behind the throne, a constant terror to evil doers, while on the desk before him might be seen sundry contraband articles and prohibited weapons, detected upon the persons of idle urchins, such as half-munched apples, popguns, whirligigs, fly-cages, and whole legions of rampant little paper game-cocks.
Giles's, to search for contraband goods, and the mob fired on the musketeers, and the musketeers fired on the mob, and nobody thought any of these occurrences much out of the common way.
In France, there is an army of patrols (as they are called) constantly employed to secure their fiscal regulations against the inroads of the dealers in contraband trade.
In an evil hour he satisfied the jealous inquiries of the contraband hotel-keeper; in an evil hour he penetrated into the somewhat unsavoury interior.
Why," replied he, "I think it just possible Dantes may have been detected with some trifling article on board ship considered here as contraband.
In consequence of this order, several muskets immediately glittered in the feeble light reflected from that mirror of the heavens, the sea; and the oblong bale of which we spoke, containing no doubt some contraband object, was transported to land, with infinite precautions.
He told me that the ship being only stranded, not sunk, the contraband cargo aboard was doubtless in good condition.
Glad was the contraband that had a seat in the pit at the Saturday matinee, and happy the Roman street-boy who ate his peanuts and guyed the gladiators from the dizzy gallery.
The contraband and stolen property was piled in assorted heaps on the back veranda of the bungalow.