Cooper pair


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Cooper pair

n.
A pair of electrons in a superconducting material that are weakly attracted and bound to each other by their interactions with the lattice, despite their electrostatic repulsion.

[After Leon Cooper.]

Cooper pair

n
(General Physics) physics a pair of weakly bound electrons responsible for the transfer of charge in a superconducting material
[C20: named after Leon Neil Cooper (born 1930), US physicist]
References in periodicals archive ?
Later, Animalou [14] and Animalou and Santilli [15] extended the model to consider the Cooper pair in superconductivity as a hadronic bound state of two identical electrons.
Researchers at NIST uncovered an important clue to this mystery by showing that a previously unappreciated factor has a strong effect on the amount of unpaired electrons in Cooper pair devices.
On the experimental side, the book reports on recent and previous observations of quantum behavior in several physical systems, coherently coupled Bose-Einstein condensates, quantum dots, superconducting quantum interference devices, Cooper pair boxes, and electron pumps in the context of the Josephson effect.
Two electrons mutually attracted to positively charged ions in a material lattice can couple to form a Cooper pair, which is crucial for superconductivity.
Topics include quantum cryptography with bipartite bound entangled states, communications channels in infinite dimensions, thermal entanglement in infinite dimensional systems, information processing with low-dimensional systems, algorithms and complexity, error correction and fault tolerance, classical and quantum fingerprinting in one-way communication, state transfer in permanently coupled chains, quantum walk asymptotics, and applications topics ranging from cavity quantum electrodynamics to carbon nanotubes and Cooper pair splitting by Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid, solid state, entangled light from optical time boundaries and working from network complexity to time complexity with optimal control.
PTSI intends to provide advanced entertainment services to customers using PTCI's existing twisted cooper pair network.
We understand theoretically what characterizes a superconductor: Electrons of opposite momentum form an unusual quantum state of zero energy called a Cooper pair.
A proper interaction between two such ripples brings the electrons into a Cooper pair.
Electrons usually repel each other due to their negative charge, but the physicists saw evidence that the electrons partnered to form Cooper pairs, which glide through a material without scattering.
These properties are due to the electrons being grouped in Cooper pairs, behaving as bosons.
At an even more basic level, sets of electrons called Cooper pairs form superconductivity.
Researchers working in physics, from the US, Europe, Brazil, Mexico, and Japan discuss Cooper pairs, superconductivity in highly correlated systems, the behavior of the Bose Einstein condensation critical temperature, the plasmon exchange model in carbon nanotubes, thermodynamic properties of point node superconductors, theory of the thermopower in YBCO, high-temperature superconductivity in carbon nanotubes, and magnetism and quark matter.