Coppers


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cop·per 1

 (kŏp′ər)
n.
1. Symbol Cu A ductile, malleable, reddish-brown metallic element that is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity and is widely used for electrical wiring, water piping, and corrosion-resistant parts, either pure or in alloys such as brass and bronze. Atomic number 29; atomic weight 63.546; melting point 1,085°C; boiling point 2,562°C; specific gravity 8.96; valence 1, 2. See Periodic Table.
2. A coin, usually of small denomination, made of copper or a copper alloy.
3. Chiefly British A large cooking pot made of copper or often of iron.
4. Any of various small butterflies of the subfamily Lycaeninae, having predominantly copper-colored wings.
5. A reddish brown.
tr.v. cop·pered, cop·per·ing, cop·pers
1. To coat or finish with a layer of copper.
2. Slang To bet against, as in faro.

[Middle English coper, from Old English, from Late Latin cuprum, from Latin Cyprium (aes), Cyprian (metal), from Cyprius, of Cyprus, from Greek Kuprios, from Kupros, Cyprus.]

cop′per·y adj.

cop·per 2

 (kŏp′ər)
n. Slang
A police officer.

[From cop.]

Coppers

Copperas (hydrated ferrous sulfate).
References in classic literature ?
Two small American children and one gave the old man a franc and three copper coins, and both started away; but they were called back, and the franc and one of the coppers were restored to them.
The new boy took two broad coppers out of his pocket and held them out with derision.
He counted his goodly coppers and cauldrons, his gold and all his clothes, but there was nothing missing; still he kept grieving about not being in his own country, and wandered up and down by the shore of the sounding sea bewailing his hard fate.
Let me see; I've just thirty-two dollars and sixty-nine cents, and had we played at a game of coppers, I couldn't have held out half an hour.
Hereaway, master; stowed in this here bit of a hole, which is all the time as hot as the cook’s coppers.
I occupied a special compartment in the train, and where ever I had to change I found at the station bearers who were ready to carry me for a few coppers.
It was a long fight between my pride and the money, but the dollars won at last, and I threw up reporting and sat day after day in the corner which I had first chosen, inspiring pity by my ghastly face and filling my pockets with coppers.
Years ago, when my whole capital would occasionally come down to "what in town the people call a bob," I would recklessly spend a penny of it, merely for the sake of having the change, all in coppers, to jingle.
He shall wash down his teeth with his blood before the coppers come in for what's left
He had no more than a few coppers left, he had sold all the clothes he could do without; he had some books and one or two odds and ends upon which he might have got a shilling or two, but the landlady was keeping an eye on his comings and goings: he was afraid she would stop him if he took anything more from his room.
He had a sense of hot sunshine upon sand, of the children of it least transiently opulent holiday makers in a circle round about him, of the whisper, "They are really gentlemen," and then dollop, dollop came the coppers in the hat.
To be thankful for coppers and not to interfere with the men while they grabble for gold, like swine round a trough, that is man's reading of the mission of women.