Coptic

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Cop·tic

 (kŏp′tĭk)
n.
The Afro-Asiatic language of the Copts, which survives only as a liturgical language of the Coptic Church.
adj.
Of or relating to the Copts, the Coptic Church, or the Coptic language.

Coptic

(ˈkɒptɪk)
n
(Languages) an Afro-Asiatic language, written in the Greek alphabet but descended from ancient Egyptian. It was extinct as a spoken language by about 1600 ad but survives in the Coptic Church
adj
1. (Languages) of or relating to this language
2. (Christian Churches, other) of or relating to the Copts
3. (Historical Terms) of or relating to the Copts
4. (Peoples) of or relating to the Copts

Cop•tic

(ˈkɒp tɪk)

n.
1. an Afroasiatic language descended from ancient Egyptian, extinct as an everyday form of speech but surviving in the liturgy and literature of the Coptic Church.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to Coptic or the Copts.
[1670–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Coptic - the liturgical language of the Coptic Church used in Egypt and EthiopiaCoptic - the liturgical language of the Coptic Church used in Egypt and Ethiopia; written in the Greek alphabet
Egyptian - the ancient and now extinct language of Egypt under the Pharaohs; written records date back to 3000 BC
Adj.1.Coptic - of or relating to the Copts or their church or language or art; "the distinctive Coptic art of 6th-century Christian Egypt"
Translations

Coptic

[ˈkɒptɪk]
A. ADJcopto
B. CPD the Coptic Church Nla Iglesia Copta

Coptic

[ˈkɒptɪk] adjcopte

Coptic

adjkoptisch
References in classic literature ?
The origin of its name, like the origin of its waters, has fired the imagination of the learned; they have sought to trace it from the Greek, the Coptic, the Sanscrit; but all that matters little now, since we have made it surrender the secret of its source
It is my analysis of the documents found in the Coptic monasteries of Syria and Egypt, a work which will cut deep at the very foundation of revealed religion.
Elliot had a profound knowledge of Coptic, which he concealed as far as possible, and quoted French phrases so exquisitely that it was hard to believe that he could also speak the ordinary tongue.