coral

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cor·al

 (kôr′əl, kŏr′-)
n.
1.
a. A rocklike deposit consisting of the calcareous skeletons secreted by various marine invertebrates, chiefly anthozoans. Coral deposits often accumulate to form reefs or islands in warm seas.
b. A polyp or colony of polyps of any of the numerous anthozoans that secrete a hard or flexible skeleton, especially the reef-building hard corals.
c. A polyp or colony of polyps of any of various hydrozoans that secrete hard skeletons, such as the fire corals.
d. The hard skeleton of various corals, especially of red corals of the genus Corallium, used to make jewelry and ornaments.
e. An object made of this material.
2. A deep or strong pink to moderate red or reddish orange.
3. The unfertilized eggs of a female lobster, which turn a reddish color when cooked.
adj.
Of a deep or strong pink to moderate red or reddish orange.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin corallium, from Greek korallion.]

coral

(ˈkɒrəl)
n
1. (Animals) any marine mostly colonial coelenterate of the class Anthozoa having a calcareous, horny, or soft skeleton. See also stony coral, sea fan
2. (Zoology)
a. the calcareous or horny material forming the skeleton of certain of these animals
b. (as modifier): a coral reef. See also red coral
3. (Animals)
a. a rocklike aggregation of certain of these animals or their skeletons, forming an island or reef
b. (as modifier): a coral island.
4. (Jewellery)
a. an object made of coral, esp a piece of jewellery
b. (as modifier): a coral necklace.
5. (Colours)
a. a deep-pink to yellowish-pink colour
b. (as adjective): coral lipstick.
6. (Cookery) the roe of a lobster or crab, which becomes pink when cooked
[C14: from Old French, from Latin corāllium, from Greek korallion, probably of Semitic origin]

cor•al

(ˈkɔr əl, ˈkɒr-)

n.
1. the hard, variously colored, calcareous skeleton secreted by certain marine polyps.
2. such skeletons collectively, forming reefs, islands, etc.
3. any of several solitary or colonial anthozoan marine polyps that secrete this calcareous skeleton.
4. a color ranging from reddish to pinkish yellow.
5. the roe of the lobster, resembling red coral when cooked.
6. something made of coral.
adj.
7. made of coral.
8. making coral: a coral polyp.
9. resembling coral, esp. in color.
[1275–1325; Middle English coral(l) < Latin corāll(i)um < Greek korallion red coral, perhaps < Semitic; compare Hebrew gōrāl pebble]

cor·al

(kôr′əl)
1. Any of numerous small, sedentary animals that often form massive colonies in shallow sea water. They secrete a cup-shaped skeleton of calcium carbonate, which they can retreat into when in danger. Corals are cnidarians and have stinging tentacles radiating around their mouth opening. The tentacles are used in catching prey.
2. A hard, stony substance consisting of the skeletons of these animals. It is typically white, pink, or reddish and can form large reefs that support an abundance of ocean fish.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coral - a variable color averaging a deep pinkcoral - a variable color averaging a deep pink
pink - a light shade of red
2.coral - the hard stony skeleton of a Mediterranean coral that has a delicate red or pink color and is used for jewelrycoral - the hard stony skeleton of a Mediterranean coral that has a delicate red or pink color and is used for jewelry
opaque gem - a gemstone that is opaque
3.coral - unfertilized lobster roe; reddens in cooking; used as garnish or to color sauces
lobster - flesh of a lobster
hard roe, roe - fish eggs or egg-filled ovary; having a grainy texture
4.coral - marine colonial polyp characterized by a calcareous skeleton; masses in a variety of shapes often forming reefs
actinozoan, anthozoan - sessile marine coelenterates including solitary and colonial polyps; the medusoid phase is entirely suppressed
gorgonian, gorgonian coral - corals having a horny or calcareous branching skeleton
madrepore, madriporian coral, stony coral - corals having calcareous skeletons aggregations of which form reefs and islands
Adj.1.coral - of a strong pink to yellowish-pink color
chromatic - being or having or characterized by hue
Translations
لوْن المَـرجـانمَرْجـانمَرْجَان
korálkorálová barva
koralkoral-koralrød
koralli
koralj
korallkorallpiros
kórallrauîbleikur litur
珊瑚
산호
koralaskoraliniskoralinis rifaskoralo spalvakoralų
koralliskoraļļkrāsakoraļļu-
koralová farba
korall
หินปะการัง
mercanmercan rengimercandan
san hô

coral

[ˈkɒrəl]
A. Ncoral m
B. CPDde coral, coralino
coral island Nisla f coralina
coral necklace Ncollar m de coral
coral reef Narrecife m de coral
Coral Sea NMar m del Coral

coral

[ˈkɒrəl]
ncorail m
modif [necklace] → de corailcoral reef nrécif m coralien

coral

n
Koralle f; coral necklaceKorallenkette f
(= colour)Korallenrot nt

coral

in cpdsKorallen-;
coral-coloured
adjkorallenfarbig
coral island
coral reef
nKorallenriff nt
Coral Sea
nKorallenmeer nt
coral snake
nKorallennatter f

coral

[ˈkɒrl]
1. ncorallo
2. adj (island) → corallino/a
coral necklace → collana di corallo

coral

(ˈkorəl) noun, adjective
1. (of) a hard substance of various colours, made up of skeletons of a kind of tiny sea animal. a necklace made of coral; a coral reef.
2. (of) an orange-pink colour.

coral

مَرْجَان korál koral Koralle κοράλι coral koralli corail koralj corallo 珊瑚 산호 koraal korall koral coral коралл korall หินปะการัง mercan san hô 珊瑚

coral

n coral m
References in periodicals archive ?
Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary, developed on salt domes rising above the sea floor in the Gulf of Mexico, provides habitat for a variety of tropical wildlife, including hundreds of shallow water Caribbean reef fish and invertebrates, manta rays, whale sharks and coral heads bigger than cars.
Working the coral heads and channels with surface plugs was amazing for mutton snapper, 'cudas, jacks and occasionally grouper and tarpon.
There were dozens of coral heads of many different species to explore.
We take ample care while snorkelling to not knock off any coral heads," said Freeman.
Moreover, the coral colonies provide some of the most important habitats of bivalves in the area of study, where the coral decrease will result in a loss of coral-association molluscs and in a shift towards bivalve crevice dwellers in coral heads.
There are a lot of coral heads out here," he said, "and a lot of the beaches haven't had hydrostatic testing done to ensure safe landing areas for the utility landing craft (ICUs).
Their average size falls in a range between two to three feet, and their narrow body and flattened heads are adapted to wiggling under and into coral heads and crevices to catch their prey.
Data analysis compared the relative abundance and diversity of species on varying size coral heads.
The sensitivity of corals to increases in C was demonstrated by Mitchell and Chet (1975) with coral heads exposed to low concentrations of various substances, including crude oil (100 ppm) and organic matter (1000 ppm, in the form of dextrose), under controlled laboratory conditions.
Synalpheus charon lives in crevices at the bases of coral heads (Castro 1971), but its relationship with the coral and other inhabitants of the colony or its predators is unknown.
Many trawls, called roller trawls or rockhoppers, have large rubber discs or steel bobbins that ride over boulders and coral heads, which might otherwise snag the net.
The colorful bluish-green or yellowish-orange fish are best harvested in the summer by trapping or gillnetting along sheltered lagoons or among low-waterline coral heads.