corm

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corm

 (kôrm)
n.
A short thick solid food-storing underground stem, sometimes bearing papery scale leaves, as in the crocus or gladiolus.

[New Latin cormus, from Greek kormos, a trimmed tree trunk; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

corm

(kɔːm)
n
(Botany) an organ of vegetative reproduction in plants such as the crocus, consisting of a globular stem base swollen with food and surrounded by papery scale leaves. Compare bulb1
[C19: from New Latin cormus, from Greek kormos tree trunk from which the branches have been lopped]
ˈcormous adj

corm

(kɔrm)

n.
an enlarged, fleshy, bulblike base of a plant stem that stores food, as in a crocus.
[1820–30; < New Latin cormus < Greek kormós a tree trunk with boughs lopped off, akin to keírein to cut off, hew]
corm′like`, adj.
cor′moid, adj.
cor′mous, adj.

corm

(kôrm)
A fleshy underground stem that is similar to a bulb but stores its food as stem tissue and has fewer and thinner leaf-like scales. The crocus and gladiolus produce new shoots from corms. Compare bulb, rhizome, runner, tuber.

corm

A swollen stem that has a bulb-like appearance, but without the scales of true bulbs. Corms usually have a papery outer skin. Unlike tubers, a new corm is produced annually.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corm - solid swollen underground bulb-shaped stem or stem base and serving as a reproductive structurecorm - solid swollen underground bulb-shaped stem or stem base and serving as a reproductive structure
stalk, stem - a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ
Translations

corm

[kɔːm] N (Bot) → bulbo m

corm

nKnolle f

corm

[kɔːm] n (Bot) → cormo
References in periodicals archive ?
To naturalise in grass, bore threeinch deep holes in the lawn, inserting the corms two inches apart before filling the holes with ordinary soil.
Delivery from March 2015, gladioli supplied as corms.
In the confines of a garden, clumps tend to become congested and consequently unproductive, so it is good practice to lift them every two years, keep the fat, new top corms and discard the rest.
Before you know where you are, a few corms can magically multiply, their pale lavender flowers washing the dark ground with their presence, like spilt milk.
If you have the patience, plant corms deep and put old chicken wire over them before returning the soil.
The small offshoots (cormels, the size of garden peas) can be saved and grown on for several years until they reach flowering size, but as the corms are inexpensive, most homeowners expand their glad collection by additional purchases yearly.
Saffron corms produce both fibrous roots and contractile roots.
Gladioli and other summer-flowering corms such as ixias and sparaxis, tubers of tropaeolum tuberosum and half-hardy summer-flowering bulbs including tigridias and chincherinchees, should be lifted in autumn when the foliage has been blackened by frost.
Space the corms at about 10-15cm apart and plant twice as deep as the corm is tall.
Plant corms (anemone, crocus and freesia) 3 inches apart and bulbs (tulip, daffodil, hyacinth) 5 inches apart.
Contact: Ana Corms Tel:[52] (55) 5090-4292 Fax:[52] (55) 5090-4460 acorres@fonatur.
Native to southern Africa, these perennials, which grow from corms, thrive in well-drained soil amended with compost.