Corn Law


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Corn Law

n.
One of a series of British laws in force before 1846 regulating the grain trade and restricting imports of grain.

Corn′ Law`


n.
any of the British laws regulating domestic and foreign trade in grain, the last of which was repealed in 1846.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time that Elliott was coming into prominence as the Corn Law Rhymer, gender relationships among the working classes were undergoing decisive change.
The classic example of this, and one of the most strikingly successful uses of the platform to enlist the support of middle-class women, was the agitation against the corn laws led by the Anti-Corn Law League.
In his maiden speech in parliament in 1841, Cobden warned the Corn Law Protectionists that "You and yours will vanish like chaff before the whirlwind" (I, 10), and when Bright defended his own views concerning the proper application of corn, he passed judgement on Disraeli's policies and eloquence in a single sweep: "his chaff is excellent, but his wheat is abominable
A political history of the House of Lords, 1811-1846, from the regency to corn law repeal.
1846 - The Third Pie - The Repeal of the Corn Laws: The Corn Law Act had made bread too expensive to be part of the ordinary person''s staple diet.
With the exception of the Corn Law votes, less than thirty percent of the coalition's membership even voted on most issues.
Sir Robert Peel's Tory government eventually agrees to alleviate poverty and repeals the Corn Law in January 1846.
For this he was commemorated in stone in St George's Square, the pedestal on which he stood engraved with one of his speeches on Corn Law Reform.
The Anti-Corn Law League was formed in 1839 to campaign for the repeal of the Corn Laws.
They demanded protection and got it in the legislation o f 1815 known as the Corn Law Act, prohibiting imports of grain until the domestic price had reached a level palatable to the farmers.
He's taken by Rotherham's Corn Law roundabout, an unlikely tribute to Ebenezer Elliott.
In the run up to Waterloo there were food riots on the streets of London, while a ring of steel was put up around Parliament to protect MPs and peers from a mob protesting against the passage of the Corn Law legislation.