Corn Law


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Corn Law

n.
One of a series of British laws in force before 1846 regulating the grain trade and restricting imports of grain.

Corn′ Law`


n.
any of the British laws regulating domestic and foreign trade in grain, the last of which was repealed in 1846.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abolitionist" MPs favored Corn Law repeal throughout the decade with impressive voting participation rates of eighty-five percent and higher.
AFTER TWO DECADES OF BAD HARVESTS, high bread prices and widespread unrest, The Corn Law of 1815 dismayed British radicals and was inevitably seen to be in the interests of landowners rather than consumers.
Sir Robert Peel's Tory government eventually agrees to alleviate poverty and repeals the Corn Law in January 1846.
For this he was commemorated in stone in St George's Square, the pedestal on which he stood engraved with one of his speeches on Corn Law Reform.
They demanded protection and got it in the legislation o f 1815 known as the Corn Law Act, prohibiting imports of grain until the domestic price had reached a level palatable to the farmers.
The Anti-Corn Law League was formed in 1839 to campaign for the repeal of the Corn Laws.
He's taken by Rotherham's Corn Law roundabout, an unlikely tribute to Ebenezer Elliott.
vi BOSMAN'S balance for weighing a corn law, London 1815, 20p.
On Wheelers account, Anti-Corn Law industrialists, merchants, and shopkeepers collaborate to provoke strikes that will then be used as leverage in the free-trade cause, but they are never entirely successful at convincing the workers themselves that they are striking for repeal of the Corn Laws.
Both texts contain a certain subtext in the way that the pair are contrasted: Chartism was working-class, threatened violence, was not respectable, was unrealistic in its political goals and economic expectations, and ultimately failed to see its objectives written into law, and therefore was a bad thing; the Anti-Corn Law League was middle-class, orderly, respectable, had a clear and realistic goal, and attained its objectives with the repeal of the Corn Laws, and therefore was a good thing.
For example the Corn Law in England that barred import of much lower priced corn in the interest of the rich agricultural lobby.
In From the Corn Laws to Free Trade, Cheryl Schonhardt-Bailey takes a fresh and rigorous look at the determinants of Corn Law repeal in mid-nineteenth-century Great Britain and tries to integrate the role of broader economic interests with the role of ideas and politics to find out why the British adopted free trade.