Corn Laws


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Related to Corn Laws: Anti corn law league

Corn Laws

pl n
(Historical Terms) the laws introduced in Britain in 1804 to protect domestic farmers against foreign competition by the imposition of a heavy duty on foreign corn: repealed in 1846. See also Anti-Corn Law League

Corn Laws

1815–46 British legislation regulating grain imports. They were beneficial to farmers but caused staple food shortages in larger, particularly industrial, towns and in impoverished rural areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Larger groupings of writers can be remembered, even if many of those introduced fail to make a great individual impression: there are the mercantilists, the classical trade theorists, the writers on the Corn Laws and commercial policy, contributors to discussions on gold, money, and trade, and those persons who focused on issues of free trade and protectionism.
And in other news, Robert Peel has repealed the Corn Laws and quit as Prime Minister.
Robert Peel, as founder of the modern Conservative Party in Britain, did not need a theorist to tell him that his country's increasingly important commercial class had to be accommodated, even if that meant repealing the Corn Laws so dear to the country squires who considered themselves the body and soul of the party.
This epitomises the concept of forgetting the lessons from history as the CAP is simply a repeat of the Corn Laws in the 19th century.
In 1896 two pies were made to mark the |50th anniversary of the Repeal of the Corn Laws.
Both men were staunch supporters of free trade and when Peel resigned because of his support for the repeal of the Corn Laws, he was joined by Aberdeen.
Capitalism has been on the rise in Britain since the repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846.
Bright was its greatest orator and worked intimately in tandem with his greatest friend, Richard Cobden, to spread the campaign for free trade throughout the north and then across the land, culminating in the repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846.
She begins with the opening of the Great Western Railway in 1838, which sped up mail delivery, and describes how this new way of communication affected human relationships, the economy, industry, and social relations in Britain, as well as how it sparked other revolutionary events, such as the repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846.
Free trade" became a mantra in nineteenth-century Britain largely as a reaction against the duties on the foreign food grains, known as the Corn Laws, imposed in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century and enduring until 1846.
Sir Robert Peel remains as one of the most important men in recent British history because of his founding of London's Metropolitan Constabulary and his change of heart over the Corn Laws.