stent

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stent
top: A balloon catheter with a stent is inserted into a clogged artery.center: The balloon is inflated, expanding the stent.bottom: The stent is placed and the balloon catheter removed, keeping the artery open.

stent

 (stĕnt)
n.
1. A device used to support a bodily orifice or cavity during skin grafting or to immobilize a skin graft following placement.
2. A short tubular device made of wire mesh or fabric that is placed permanently in an anatomical passage, usually an artery during angioplasty, to keep it open after occlusion.

[After Charles R. Stent (1845-1901), British dentist.]

stent

(stɛnt)
n
(Surgery) med a tube of plastic or sprung metal mesh placed inside a hollow tube to reopen it or keep it open; uses in surgery include preventing a blood vessel from closing, esp after angioplasty, and assisting healing after an anastomosis
[C19: after Charles Stent (1807–85), English dentist]

stent

(stɛnt)
n.
Med. a small, expandable tube used for inserting in a blocked vessel or other part.
[1960–65; orig. uncertain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stent - a slender tube inserted inside a tubular body part (as a blood vessel) to provide support during and after surgical anastomosis
tube, tubing - conduit consisting of a long hollow object (usually cylindrical) used to hold and conduct objects or liquids or gases
Translations

stent

n stent m; malla cilíndrica para mantener abierto un conducto, una arteria o una vena; bare-metal — stent de metal desnudo; drug-eluting — stent liberador de fármaco(s)
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Growth in Angioplasty Procedures Vs Stent Penetration Worldwide: (1997-2006) (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-5 Small Vessels - A Major Cause of Restenosis II-5 Aging Population Propels Coronary Stent Market II-5 Cell Transplantation - A Major Threat to Coronary Stents II-5 Next Generation Stents - A Boon for Treating Coronary Diseases II-6 Direct Stenting Systems Spur Growth II-6 Drug Choice Impacts Market Entry II-6 Price and Quality Concerns Dog Supplies and Demand for DES II-7 DES' Introduction Skyrockets Coronary Stent Prices II-7 Legal Challenges Right Behind II-7 New Competition Puts Tabs on Coronary Stenting II-7
TLR is the rate of re-treatment of patients after coronary stenting and is widely viewed by physicians as an important clinical marker of drug eluting stent effectiveness.
Improvement in cardiac care resulting in greater number of positive outcomes of coronary stenting will also lead to market expansion.
TLR is the rate of retreatment of patients after coronary stenting and is widely viewed by physicians as a critical clinical marker of drug eluting stent effectiveness.