corporation

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Related to Corporations: Multinational corporations

cor·po·ra·tion

 (kôr′pə-rā′shən)
n.
1. An entity such as a business, municipality, or organization, that involves more than one person but that has met the legal requirements to operate as a single person, so that it may enter into contracts and engage in transactions under its own identity.
2. Such a body created for purposes of government. Also called body corporate.
3. A group of people combined into or acting as one body.
4. Informal A protruding abdominal region; a potbelly.

corporation

(ˌkɔːpəˈreɪʃən)
n
1. (Law) a group of people authorized by law to act as a legal personality and having its own powers, duties, and liabilities
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Also called: municipal corporation the municipal authorities of a city or town
3. a group of people acting as one body
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) See public corporation
5. (Anatomy) informal a large paunch or belly

cor•po•ra•tion

(ˌkɔr pəˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an association of individuals, created by law and having an existence apart from that of its members as well as distinct and inherent powers and liabilities.
2. an incorporated business; company.
3. (often cap.) the principal officials of a city or town.
4. any group of persons united or regarded as united in one body.
5. Informal. a paunch; potbelly.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin corporātiō guild, Latin: physical makeup, build. See corporate, -tion]
cor`po•ra′tion•al, adj.
usage: See collective noun.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corporation - a business firm whose articles of incorporation have been approved in some statecorporation - a business firm whose articles of incorporation have been approved in some state
greenmail - (corporation) the practice of purchasing enough shares in a firm to threaten a takeover and thereby forcing the owners to buy those shares back at a premium in order to stay in business
judgement in personam, judgment in personam, personal judgement, personal judgment - a judgment rendered against an individual (or corporation) for the payment of money damages
case study - a careful study of some social unit (as a corporation or division within a corporation) that attempts to determine what factors led to its success or failure
conglomerate, empire - a group of diverse companies under common ownership and run as a single organization
large cap - a corporation with a large capitalization; "he works for a large cap"
small cap - a corporation with a small capitalization; "this annual conference is a showcase for ambitious small caps"
business firm, firm, house - the members of a business organization that owns or operates one or more establishments; "he worked for a brokerage house"
close corporation, closed corporation, private corporation, privately held corporation - a corporation owned by a few people; shares have no public market
closely held corporation - stock is publicly traded but most is held by a few shareholders who have no plans to sell
shell corporation, shell entity - a company that is incorporated but has no assets or operations
FDIC, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation - a federally sponsored corporation that insures accounts in national banks and other qualified institutions
Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, FHLMC, Freddie Mac - a corporation authorized by Congress to provide a secondary market for residential mortgages
Fannie Mae, Federal National Mortgage Association, FNMA - a federally chartered corporation that purchases mortgages
Boy Scouts of America - a corporation that operates through a national council that charters local councils all over the United States; the purpose is character building and citizenship training
event planner - someone who plans social events as a profession (usually for government or corporate officials)
dead hand, mortmain - real property held inalienably (as by an ecclesiastical corporation)
redemption - repayment of the principal amount of a debt or security at or before maturity (as when a corporation repurchases its own stock)
zero coupon bond, zero-coupon bond - a bond that is issued at a deep discount from its value at maturity and pays no interest during the life of the bond; the commonest form of zero-coupon security
2.corporation - slang for a paunchcorporation - slang for a paunch      
paunch, belly - a protruding abdomen
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"

corporation

noun
1. business, company, concern, firm, society, association, organization, enterprise, establishment, corporate body chairman of a huge multi-national corporation
2. town council, council, municipal authorities, civic authorities The local corporation has given permission for the work to proceed.
Quotations
"corporation: an ingenious device for obtaining individual profit without individual responsibility" [Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary]

corporation

noun
A commercial organization:
Informal: outfit.
Translations
هَيْـئَـه
společnost
virksomhed
gospodarska družbakorporacija
anonim şirket

corporation

[ˌkɔːpəˈreɪʃən]
A. N
1. (Comm) → corporación f (US) (= limited company) → sociedad f anónima
2. [of city] → ayuntamiento m
3. (Brit) (= paunch) → panza f
B. CPDcorporativo
corporation tax N (Brit) → impuesto m sobre sociedades

corporation

[ˌkɔːrpəˈreɪʃən] n
(= company) → société f

corporation

n
(= municipal corporation)Gemeinde f, → Stadt f; the Mayor and Corporationder Bürgermeister und die Stadt
(Brit Comm: = incorporated company) → Handelsgesellschaft f; (US Comm: = limited liability company) → Gesellschaft fmit beschränkter Haftung; private corporation (Comm) → Privatunternehmen nt; public corporation (Comm) → staatliches Unternehmen
(Brit, hum, = large belly) → Schmerbauch m

corporation

:
corporation bus
nStadtbus m, → städtischer Omnibus
corporation property
ngemeindeeigener Besitz
corporation tax
corporation tram
corporation transport

corporation

[ˌkɔːpəˈreɪʃn] n (Comm) → società f inv (Am) → società di capitali; (of town) → consiglio comunale

corporate

(ˈkoːpərət) adjective
united. corporate effort.
ˌcorpoˈration noun
a body of people acting as one individual eg for administration or business purposes. the British Broadcasting Corporation.
References in classic literature ?
Neither your time, nor perhaps the cheerful nature of this occasion, permit me here to enter upon the examination of this anti-revolutionary theory, which arrays State sovereignty against the constituent sovereignty of the people, and distorts the Constitution of the United States into a league of friendship between confederate corporations.
The one can confer no privileges whatever; the other can make denizens of aliens, noblemen of commoners; can erect corporations with all the rights incident to corporate bodies.
The precise extent of the common law, and the statute law, the maritime law, the ecclesiastical law, the law of corporations, and other local laws and customs, remains still to be clearly and finally established in Great Britain, where accuracy in such subjects has been more industriously pursued than in any other part of the world.
These, however, are not individuals, but corporations; and corporations, it is very well known, have neither bodies to be kicked nor souls to be damned.
In London at the present moment there exist some thousands of respectable, neatly-dressed, mechanical, unenterprising young men, employed at modest salaries by various banks, corporations, stores, shops, and business firms.
It was his opinion that everything in the State needed reform except the Corporations.
You still believe in equality, and yet you do the work of the corporations, and the corporations, from day to day, are busily engaged in burying equality.
The function of the corporation lawyer was to serve, by corrupt methods, the money-grabbing propensities of the corporations.
The condition of the operatives is becoming every day more like that of the English; and it cannot be wondered at, since, as far as I have heard or observed, the principal object is, not that mankind may be well and honestly clad, but, unquestionably, that corporations may be enriched.
The secrets of kings and courts would be mine, the machinations of diplomats and politicians, the play of stock-gamblers, the plans of trusts and corporations.
The weekly charge in this establishment for each female patient is three dollars, or twelve shillings English; but no girl employed by any of the corporations is ever excluded for want of the means of payment.
Five big corporations and the two railroads have taken the thing up in dead earnest.