corridor

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cor·ri·dor

 (kôr′ĭ-dər, -dôr′, kŏr′-)
n.
1. A narrow hallway, passageway, or gallery, often with rooms or apartments opening onto it.
2.
a. A tract of land designated or used for a specific purpose, as for railroad lines, highways, or pipelines.
b. A route designated for a specific purpose: a hazardous material corridor; a sea corridor for shipping; a flight corridor.
c. A route or tract of land used by migrating animals.
3. A thickly populated strip of land connecting two or more urban areas: people who live in the Boston-Washington corridor.
Idiom:
corridors of power
The places or positions from which people in authority wield power.

[French, from Italian corridore, from correre, to run, from Latin currere; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

corridor

(ˈkɒrɪˌdɔː)
n
1. (Architecture) a hallway or passage connecting parts of a building
2. (Physical Geography) a strip of land or airspace along the route of a road or river: the M1 corridor.
3. (Physical Geography) a strip of land or airspace that affords access, either from a landlocked country to the sea (such as the Polish corridor, 1919-39, which divided Germany) or from a state to an exclave (such as the Berlin corridor, 1945–90, which passed through the former East Germany)
4. (Railways) a passageway connecting the compartments of a railway coach
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) corridors of power the higher echelons of government, the Civil Service, etc, considered as the location of power and influence
6. (Aeronautics) a flight path that affords safe access for intruding aircraft
7. (Astronautics) the path that a spacecraft must follow when re-entering the atmosphere, above which lift is insufficient and below which heating effects are excessive
[C16: from Old French, from Old Italian corridore, literally: place for running, from correre to run, from Latin currere]

cor•ri•dor

(ˈkɔr ɪ dər, -ˌdɔr, ˈkɒr-)

n.
1. a passageway giving access to rooms, apartments, ship cabins, railway compartments, etc.; hallway.
2. a narrow passageway of land, as between an inland country and an outlet to the sea.
3. a densely populated region with major overland and air transportation routes: the Northeast corridor.
4. a restricted path along which an aircraft must travel to avoid hostile action, other air traffic, etc.
[1585–95; < Middle French < Upper Italian corridore=corr(ere) to run (< Latin currere]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corridor - an enclosed passagewaycorridor - an enclosed passageway; rooms usually open onto it
gallery - a covered corridor (especially one extending along the wall of a building and supported with arches or columns)
hall, hallway - an interior passage or corridor onto which rooms open; "the elevators were at the end of the hall"
passageway - a passage between rooms or between buildings

corridor

noun passage, alley, aisle, hallway, passageway He raced down the corridor towards the exit.
Translations
مـَمَرّمَمْشـى، رَواق، مَمَـر
коридор
chodbakoridor
korridorgang
käytävä
hodnik
gangur
廊下
복도
koridorius
koridors
hodnik
korridorflygkorridor
ทางเดินยาว
hành lang

corridor

[ˈkɒrɪdɔːʳ] Npasillo m, corredor m
the corridors of powerlos pasillos del poder

corridor

[ˈkɒrɪdɔːr] n
(in building)couloir m, corridor m
(= area) the M25 corridor → l'axe de la M25

corridor

nKorridor m; (in building also, in train, bus) → Gang m; in the corridors of poweran den Schalthebeln der Macht

corridor

[ˈkɒrɪdɔːʳ] ncorridoio

corridor

(ˈkoridoː) noun
a passageway, especially one off which rooms open. Go along the corridor and up the stairs.

corridor

مـَمَرّ chodba korridor Korridor διάδρομος corredor, pasillo käytävä couloir hodnik corridoio 廊下 복도 gang korridor korytarz corredor коридор korridor ทางเดินยาว koridor hành lang 走廊
References in classic literature ?
The burrow sloped into the ground at a gentle angle, so that we could see where the two corridors united, and the floor was dusty from use, like a little highway over which much travel went.
In the corridors were many people, and with his eyes on the broad shoulders of the assistant district attorney, Thorndike pushed his way through them.
Young as she was, I was struck, throughout our little tour, with her confidence and courage with the way, in empty chambers and dull corridors, on crooked staircases that made me pause and even on the summit of an old machicolated square tower that made me dizzy, her morning music, her disposition to tell me so many more things than she asked, rang out and led me on.
A vile wind that has no doubt blown ere this through prison corridors and cells, and wards of hospitals, and ventilated them, and now comes blowing hither as innocent as fleeces.
For one evening the old man came home in a great state of excitement, with the tale that he had been approached by a man in one of the corridors of the pickle rooms of Durham's, and asked what he would pay to get a job.
Why, man, the corridors are in guard and keep of men-at-arms.
The procession moved along the main avenue some three-quarters of a mile, and then groups and couples began to slip aside into branch avenues, fly along the dismal corridors, and take each other by surprise at points where the corridors joined again.
Rebecca's mood had passed from that of excitement into a sort of exaltation, and when the first bell rang through the corridors announcing that in five minutes the class would proceed in a body to the church for the exercises, she stood motionless and speechless at the window with her hand on her heart.
It's in the house--down one of those long corridors.
Descending the stairs, on her way to the house-keeper's room, she passed by the entrances to two long stone corridors, with rows of doors opening on them; one corridor situated on the second, and one on the first floor of the house.
They crowded to the grates and shed tears there; but, twenty places in the projected entertainments had to be refilled, and the time was, at best, short to the lock-up hour, when the common rooms and corridors would be delivered over to the great dogs who kept watch there through the night.
Milk and honey" would have been an appropriate inscription for the delicious little library which parents who, I surmised, doted on Nicolete in vain, had allowed her to build in a wild woodland corner of her ancestral park, half a mile away from the great house, where, for all its corridors and galleries, she could never feel, at all events, spiritually alone.