cosmological argument


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Related to cosmological argument: Ontological argument, Teleological argument

cosmological argument

n
(Philosophy) philosophy one of the arguments that purport to prove the existence of God from empirical facts about the universe, esp the argument to the existence of a first cause. Compare ontological argument1, teleological argument
References in periodicals archive ?
In a two-volume anthology of recent articles on the Kalam cosmological argument that God created the universe, this second volume contains scientific arguments.
Shifting a bit to the subject of African ethics, Kiatezua Lubanzadio Luyaluka demonstrates the existence of an African ethics via the existence and demonstrated scientific nature of solar religion, which characterized the civilizations of ancient Egypt and Sumer that has been preserved in Kongo culture based on an empirical premise that establishes a cosmological argument.
Feser is at his best as he explains, for instance, that Aquinas's fifth way is not a design argument, that the cosmological argument as traditionally understood does not include the silly premise that "everything has a cause," and that Aquinas's five ways, correctly understood, rule out the possibility of natural beings who can go on existing by themselves, without being conserved in being.
The cosmological argument for the existence of God however outweighs all other contemplations debated upon considering the deliberation that everything that begins to exist has a cause.
7-134) commences with the kalam cosmological argument for God based on the temporal production of the world, and thereby its need for a creator.
Sinclair, "The Kalam Cosmological Argument," in The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology, ed.
The cosmological argument is one of the three philosophical arguments used by philosophers and theologians to rationally prove or demonstrate God's existence.
Now, it is common philosophical knowledge that Descartes has employed at least three types of argument on the existence of God: The "semantic argument" (1); the ontological argument (2); the cosmological argument (3).
It is informative, however, to compare those passages to an argument from Letter from a Gentleman in which Hume qualifies his critique of the cosmological argument by reminding that he has left the ontological argument untouched.
Thomas Aquinas' cosmological argument for the existence of God.
There has to be a cause behind it all, says the classical cosmological argument, and if physics cannot produce it, so much the better.
The religious vision of the biblical world, he argues, has been fundamental in opening the physical universe to a healthy scientific study; biblical monotheism can ground a strong cosmological argument capable of counteracting theories of radical scientific materialism that threaten to destroy any real sense of purpose.