cottonwood

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cottonwood
Populus deltoides

cot·ton·wood

 (kŏt′n-wo͝od′)
n.
Any of several North American poplar trees, especially Populus deltoides, which has triangular leaves and a tuft of cottony hairs on the seeds.

cottonwood

(ˈkɒtənˌwʊd)
n
1. (Plants) any of several North American poplars, esp Populus deltoides, whose seeds are covered with cottony hairs
2. (Plants) Also called: tauhinu a native New Zealand shrub, Cassinia leptophylla, with daisy-like flowers

cot•ton•wood

(ˈkɒt nˌwʊd)

n.
any of several American poplars, as Populus deltoides, with cottony tufts on the seeds.
[1795–1805]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cottonwood - any of several North American trees of the genus Populus having a tuft of cottony hairs on the seedcottonwood - any of several North American trees of the genus Populus having a tuft of cottony hairs on the seed
poplar tree, poplar - any of numerous trees of north temperate regions having light soft wood and flowers borne in catkins
Eastern cottonwood, necklace poplar, Populus deltoides - a common poplar of eastern and central United States; cultivated in United States for its rapid growth and luxuriant foliage and in Europe for timber
Populus trichocarpa, Western balsam poplar, black cottonwood - cottonwood of western North America with dark green leaves shining above and rusty or silvery beneath
black cottonwood, downy poplar, Populus heterophylla, swamp cottonwood, swamp poplar - North American poplar with large rounded scalloped leaves and brownish bark and wood
2.cottonwood - American basswood of the Allegheny regioncottonwood - American basswood of the Allegheny region
linden tree, basswood, lime tree, linden, lime - any of various deciduous trees of the genus Tilia with heart-shaped leaves and drooping cymose clusters of yellowish often fragrant flowers; several yield valuable timber
Translations

cottonwood

[ˈkɒtnwʊd] N (US) → álamo m de Virginia

cottonwood

[ˈkɒtənwʊd] n (= tree) → peuplier m de Virginiecotton wool n (British)ouate f, coton m hydrophile
References in classic literature ?
She pointed into the gold cottonwood tree behind whose top we stood and said again, `What name?
The rivers, in general, were skirted with willows and bitter cottonwood trees, and the prairies covered with wormwood.
A new fire had been built in the fire pit, and it had spread to a large cottonwood tree, Carver said.
Iowa State University scientists have built a device that mimics the branches and leaves of a cottonwood tree and generates electricity when its artificial leaves sway in the wind.
She was with her sisters Abigail, now 15, and Adelynn, now 11, when, frustrated, she tried to climb the family's hollowed-out cottonwood tree.
It was snowing, so my plan was to head for a big cottonwood tree that sat on the bank of a large drainage ditch.
After our son died, there was a cottonwood tree that broke off," Vance said.
I helped a friend cut a large, mostly dead cottonwood tree from his yard.
Specifically, we were interested in the following questions: (1) does the level of damage by Black Bears differ between male and female Black Cottonwood trees; (2) does the size of the Black Cottonwood tree affect the level of catkin and seed pod harvest by Black Bears; (3) what is the potential nutrient value of male and female Black Cottonwood catkins and of seed pods; and (4) what is the nutritional composition of Black Cottonwood catkins and seed pods compared to some other potential plant foods that are present in the area in spring, namely male catkins of Sitka Alder (Alnus viridis sinuata), which apparently are not eaten, and stem-bases of Northern Ground Cone (Boschniakia rossi), which are frequently eaten?
After wolves were eliminated from Yellowstone National Park in 1926, cottonwood tree regeneration dropped precipitously, as elk could then munch on saplings without risk of being hunted.
This was a fairly large cottonwood tree, not something small enough to reach around and lock my arms together.
The researchers determined the haze of hydrocarbon aerosols was probably made up of fluffy, microscopic particles shaped somewhat like cottonwood tree seeds that would have blocked UV but allowed visible light through to Earth's surface, Wolf said.