cotyledon

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Related to Cotyledons: angiosperm, Monocotyledons, Dicotyledons
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cotyledon
bean seed germinating

cot·y·le·don

 (kŏt′l-ēd′n)
n.
1. Botany A leaf of the embryo of a seed plant, which upon germination either remains in the seed or emerges, enlarges, and becomes green. Also called seed leaf.
2. Anatomy One of the lobules constituting the uterine side of the mammalian placenta, consisting mainly of a rounded mass of villi.

[Latin cotylēdōn, navelwort, from Greek kotulēdōn, from kotulē, hollow object.]

cot′y·le′don·ar′y (-ēd′n-ĕr′ē), cot′y·le′don·al (-ēd′n-əl), cot′y·le′do·nous (-ēd′n-əs) adj.

cotyledon

(ˌkɒtɪˈliːdən)
n
1. (Botany) a simple embryonic leaf in seed-bearing plants, which, in some species, forms the first green leaf after germination
2. (Zoology) a tuft of villi on the mammalian placenta
[C16: from Latin: a plant, navelwort, from Greek kotulēdōn, from kotulē cup, hollow]
ˌcotyˈledonal adj
ˌcotyˈledonary adj
ˌcotyˈledonous, ˌcotyˈledoˌnoid adj

cot•y•le•don

(ˌkɒt lˈid n)

n.
the primary or rudimentary leaf of the embryo of seed plants.
[1535–45; < Latin: navelwort < Greek kotylēdṓn literally, a cuplike hollow, derivative of kotýlē cup]
cot`y•le′don•al, cot`y•le′don•ar`y (-ˌɛr i) cot`y•le′don•ous, adj.

cot·y·le·don

(kŏt′l-ēd′n)
A leaf of the embryo of a seed-bearing plant. Most cotyledons emerge, enlarge, and become green after the seed has germinated. Cotyledons either store food for the growing embryo or absorb food that has been stored in the endosperm for eventual distribution to the growing parts of the embryo. Also called seed leaf. See more at dicotyledon, monocotyledon.

cotyledon

A seed leaf that provides food for an embryo plant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cotyledon - embryonic leaf in seed-bearing plantscotyledon - embryonic leaf in seed-bearing plants
cataphyll - a reduced or scarcely developed leaf at the start of a plant's life (i.e., cotyledons) or in the early stages of leaf development
Translations

cotyledon

[ˌkɒtɪˈliːdən] Ncotiledón m

cotyledon

nKeimblatt nt

cotyledon

[ˌkɒtɪˈliːdn] n (Bot) → cotiledone m
References in classic literature ?
These historians resemble a botanist who, having noticed that some plants grow from seeds producing two cotyledons, should insist that all that grows does so by sprouting into two leaves, and that the palm, the mushroom, and even the oak, which blossom into full growth and no longer resemble two leaves, are deviations from the theory.
It can be shown that plants most widely different in habit and general appearance, and having strongly marked differences in every part of the flower, even in the pollen, in the fruit, and in the cotyledons, can be crossed.
Per-rectal examination revealed a hard bony mass adhering to uterine wall and absence of cotyledons, fremitus and foetal fluids.
2007) established an efficient genetic transformation via Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection of cotyledons and found about 33% of the resistant calli differentiated into shoots by using phosphinothricin as a selective agent.
The main source of these compounds are the seed cotyledons, but they are also present in trace amounts in the seed integuments, the barks, buds, leaves and the immature fruit pericarps of A.
In Arabidopsis, cotyledons biomass was not significantly reduced by the presence of 2,4-D residues (Figure 3C).
Phirke and Bhole [4] noted that dehulling quality is a function of both seed coat removal from cotyledons and the head splits yields.
Imagine his surprise when about a dozen of his tomato seedlings each produced three cotyledons (seed leaves) instead of the usual two.
Most of a bean is composed of two cotyledons (the stored food) that easily separate.
The sgr gene helps break down chlorophyll when leaves and cotyledons senesce.
with yellow cotyledons, small to medium seed size, and resistance to powdery mildew (caused by Erysiphe pisi DC.
Pinus pinaster cotyledons also showed a reverse relationship