Counter-Reformation


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Counter-Reformation

(ˌkaʊntəˌrɛfəˈmeɪʃən)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) the reform movement of the Roman Catholic Church in the 16th and early 17th centuries considered as a reaction to the Protestant Reformation
Translations

Counter-Reformation

[ˈkaʊntəˌrefəˈmeɪʃən] NContrarreforma f

Counter-Reformation

[ˌkaʊntəˌrɛfəˈmeɪʃn] nControriforma
References in periodicals archive ?
Early Modern English Catholicism: Identity, Memory and Counter-Reformation
Not novel, in the church, in Reformation and Counter-Reformation days.
THE ASHGATE RESEARCH COMPANION TO THE COUNTER-REFORMATION.
Perhaps the author's greatest contributions to the field are the breadth of his research--especially his use of Spanish archival material--and his ability to transcend the barriers of confessional history imposed by the Reformation and Counter-Reformation or those imposed by a secular culture.
He says it also compels scholars to rethink an entire epoch conventionally denoted by the sequence Renaissance, Reformation, and Counter-Reformation.
Cox, Virginia, The Prodigious Muse: Women's Writing in Counter-Reformation Italy, Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011; hardback; pp.
Fenlon, largely bypassed Tridentine reforms of church music; mythological painting survived in Counter-Reformation Venice, albeit in greater segregation from sacred art (T.
Miramontes has written a Counter-Reformation tract that describes, in great detail, what is expected of the model Catholic sailor and soldier, who the "enemy" is and why, and what theological principles are at stake in the struggle.
Graham Parry's Arts of the Anglican Counter-Reformation sets out to reconstruct and contextualize the "whole new world of religious art and expression" created by the ceremonialist movement within the Carolinian Church (192).
This extraordinary mood was manifested in a brief but golden period that he styles the "Anglican Counter-Reformation.
Barbara Diefendorf takes issue with those who have treated religious visionaries as mentally disturbed fanatics, as well as with those who have seen the Counter-Reformation campaign to enforce rules of claustration on women's convents as unalloyed patriarchal subjugation.
2) While the generality of Cousins's formulation renders it more provocative than explicative, his basic insight that Constable's devotional poems are divorced from the English Counter-Reformation in ways which Grundy and other earlier critics ignore is accurate and important.